Next Billion Usershttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/Next Billion Usersen-usThu, 18 Aug 2022 16:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/static/blogv2/images/google.pngNext Billion Usershttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/Building language models, one story at a timehttps://blog.google/technology/research/building-language-models-one-story-at-a-time/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="6v1s3">One-third of the world's languages are spoken in Africa, but less than 1% of African languages are represented online. This is significant because the language you speak, write or sign shapes your online experience. Language is the cornerstone of your identity, the connection to your past and the key to your future. When we can’t experience the internet in our language, it limits what we can learn, what jobs we can have, what stories we can access, and so much more.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="6v1s3">In my home country Mali, eighty percent of the population speaks Bambara as its first or second language. It is also spoken in Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Liberia and Guinea — making it one of West Africa's most widely spoken languages. But, if Bambara is your primary language, it can be difficult to have an immersive internet experience. That's why I've set out to make the internet more accessible to Bambara speakers, remove the language barrier, and bring this primarily spoken language online for everyone.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="6v1s3">To achieve this goal, a language model for Bambara needs to be built. Language models require lots of data, which typically means having hours of transcribed recordings where humans are speaking the language so that computers can learn the language through a process called Natural Language Processing. Unfortunately, Bambara lacks readily available data to train. Researchers call this being “low-resourced.” My team at Robots Mali has been trying to solve this challenge for years as part of a collaborative project called Bayɛlɛmabaga. Through collaboration with the Google Research team in Accra, we're closer to accomplishing our goals of building more resources (written and bilingual texts) for Bambara.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="6v1s3">To overcome the challenge of being “low-resourced," we teamed up with those who hold the culture's knowledge, rich history and teachings. Malian Griots are the real keepers of the Bambara collective memory, passing their knowledge only through oral storytelling. So, we gathered more than thirty griots to record them narrating generational stories. We transcribed and translated each tale to preserve the knowledge for future generations. While griots are traditionally older men, for this project, we worked to identify a diverse group of griots based on age, gender and background to build a representative group.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="6v1s3">Using these recordings we've been able to build a model for understanding Bambara speech and facilitating easy translation to other languages, known as an Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) model. As a result, we are making the world's information more accessible to millions of Bambara speakers and releasing <a href="https://zenodo.org/record/6997806#.Yv44J__MJrd">our findings</a> for the research community and everyone to benefit. Our work has allowed us to uplift traditional practices while building a new future for Bambara speakers. We’re in contact with the National Museum of Mali to donate all of the beautiful stories that the griots have narrated. The rich history and teachings from the griots will be available to the local community and public. Furthermore, the project is selected to be showcased at The Deep Learning Indaba 2022 next week, the largest machine learning conference in Africa.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="6v1s3">Most importantly, we identified oral literature as a viable resource for languages. Many languages are underrepresented online, and this project represents a big step towards bringing more of them online. Of course, there's still a lot of work to do. But, by introducing this work to the community, researchers have new tools to keep breaking down the online language barrier.</p></div></div></body></html>Thu, 18 Aug 2022 16:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/technology/research/building-language-models-one-story-at-a-time/ResearchNext Billion UsersarticleBuilding language models, one story at a timeHelping bring Bambara online one story at a time.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/translate_bambara_1.max-600x600.pngGooglehttps://blog.google/technology/research/building-language-models-one-story-at-a-time/Allahsera Tapo, PhDRochester Institute of TechnologyHow tech can support transformational growth in Africahttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/supporting-growth-in-africa/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="19vzj">This week, I was privileged to be in Kigali, Rwanda for the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (‘CHOGM’) - a forum that brings together government, business leaders and NGOs from around the world to discuss how to improve the lives of the over 2.5 billion people living in the 54 <a href="https://thecommonwealth.org/our-member-countries">independent countries</a> that make up the Commonwealth.</p><p data-block-key="eu9rf">Africa is facing multiple challenges. While Covid was first and foremost a health crisis, the economic impact continues to be severe for parts of the continent. The war in Ukraine has added further pressure on supply chains and food security. And Africa’s rapid population growth - 60% of the population will be under 24 by 2025 - creates a further pressing need to generate economic opportunity and ensure people and families can earn a living.</p><p data-block-key="fi475">Despite the challenges ahead, the mood at CHOGM was optimistic, focusing on the collaboration and solutions that can help Africa’s economic recovery. For me, harnessing technology is key to that.</p><p data-block-key="6s1d8">I grew up in Zimbabwe, then a Commonwealth country, and discovered the possibilities of the world of programming as a highschooler. Since then I’ve always been fascinated by the role technology can play in creating opportunities and helping to solve large-scale societal problems. My position at Google allows me to focus on how technology can benefit society, and I feel fortunate that it’s taken me back to Africa after just five months in the role.</p><p data-block-key="2nq5d">Google first bet on Africa with the investment in Seacom cable in about 2005: I remember hearing about it from my friends at Google at the time. Two years later, Google opened offices on the continent, and has been a partner in Africa’s economic growth and digital transformation ever since - working with local governments, policymakers, educators and entrepreneurs. Our mission in Africa is to unlock the benefits of the digital economy to everyone - providing helpful products, programmes and investments.</p><p data-block-key="80ktd">Africa’s internet economy has the potential to grow to <a href="https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/publications_ext_content/ifc_external_publication_site/publications_listing_page/google-e-conomy">$180 billion by 2025</a> - 5.2% of the continent’s GDP - bringing prosperity, opportunity and growth. African governments and businesses must turn that opportunity into a reality: integrating technology into the economy, ensuring no one is left behind, and emerging stronger from the current challenges.</p><h3 data-block-key="8vgk2">Ensuring affordable internet access</h3><p data-block-key="ft2nf">Most crucial to this is affordable internet access - a precondition for digital transformation, but still a barrier today. Across Africa, only 18% of households have an internet connection, and data costs remain a major obstacle. By actively promoting infrastructure investments, including in rural areas, Governments can support people to get online and harness the economic growth and benefits that will come with that.</p><p data-block-key="7hhik">Google is already working in partnership with African governments to do this. We’ve enabled over 100 million Africans to access the internet for the first time through our affordable Android devices, and plan to invest <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/google-for-africa/">$1 billion over the next 5 years</a> in projects that will help enable Africa’s digital transformation, including our state-of-the-art Equiano subsea cable.</p><p data-block-key="fmhq6">The cable, which lands in Namibia in the next few weeks, will provide twenty times more network capacity by connecting Africa with Europe. It will run through South Africa, Namibia, Togo, Nigeria and St Helena, enabling internet speeds up to five times faster and lowering connectivity costs by up to 21%, in turn supporting growth and jobs.</p><h3 data-block-key="6sb1n">Investing in people</h3><p data-block-key="1u1fp">Those accessing the internet need to be able to use it and transform their lives leveraging it. Working with tech companies and NGOs to foster digital skills developments, governments can ensure people can participate fully online.</p><p data-block-key="4sc4m">Google’s CEO, Sundar Pichai, made a commitment in 2017 to train 10 million Africans in digital skills. To date, Google has trained more than 6 million people across Africa through Grow with Google in partnership with local governments, and given $20 million to non-profits helping Africans develop their digital skills. Moreover, Google has committed to certifying 100,000 developers - and so far has certified more than 80,000. Last year, a <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/african-developers-creating-opportunities-and-building-future/">Google study showed the developer ecosystem in Africa is growing</a>. There are nearly 716,000 professional developers across Africa - of which 21% are women; numbers we hope to contribute to.</p><h3 data-block-key="9ipgl">Investing in startups</h3><p data-block-key="eitu0">Alongside digital skills, governments need to encourage entrepreneurs and startups - a crucial part of Africa’s economic growth and jobs creation. There has never been a shortage of entrepreneurs in Africa - what is needed are the tools, including technology, and financing to enable them.</p><p data-block-key="2n90o">Last year, we announced an Africa Investment Fund to support startup growth across Africa. Through the Fund, we invest $50 million in startups like <a href="https://safeboda.com/ug/">SafeBoda</a> and <a href="http://www.carry1st.com/">Carry1st,</a> and provide Google’s people, products and networks to help them build meaningful products for their communities. This is on top of our existing work on the <a href="https://startup.google.com/accelerator/africa/">Google for Startups Accelerator: Africa</a>, which has provided more than 80 African startups with equity-free finance, working space and expert advisors over the last three years. We also expanded the Google for Startups <a href="https://www.campus.co/africa/black-founders-fund/">Black Founders Fund</a> in 2021, supporting Black African Founders like <a href="https://shecluded.com/">Shecluded</a>, a digital financial growth resource and service startup for women.<br/></p><h3 data-block-key="2aied">Using technological innovation to solve systemic challenges</h3><p data-block-key="akp5b">Advances in technology are increasingly enabling solutions to development challenges, and with 300 million more people coming online in Africa over the next five years, the possibilities are endless. Digital finance, for example, can be used to address the barriers preventing nearly a billion African women from banking - while advances in AI have made it possible for Google to <a href="https://blog.google/products/translate/24-new-languages/">Translate more languages</a>, including Luganda - spoken by 20 million people here in Rwanda and in neighboring Uganda.</p><p data-block-key="7fcbn">Technology offers Africa a tremendous opportunity for growth, prosperity and opportunity. I’m hopeful that working in partnership, we can continue to make an impact and build on Africa’s digital revolution.</p></div></div></body></html>Fri, 24 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/supporting-growth-in-africa/Public PolicyGoogle in AfricaNext Billion UsersGrow with GooglearticleHow tech can support transformational growth in AfricaJames Manyika explains how tech can enable economic growth, jobs and prosperity across Africa, and how African governments and businesses can seize that potential.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/James_at_CHOGM.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/supporting-growth-in-africa/James ManyikaSVP Technology & SocietyRenewing our commitment to Brazilhttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-latin-america/renewing-our-commitment-to-brazil/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="l8wtf">New technology advancements during the pandemic have reshaped the way we connect, work and run businesses around the world. Today, we gathered Googlers, journalists, business leaders, civil society representatives and public figures for our Google for Brazil event in São Paulo to demonstrate how we’ll contribute to Brazil’s continued digital transformation.</p><p data-block-key="9uiu3">The event happened on the heels of the <a href="https://www.ixsummitamericas.org/">IX Summit of the Americas</a>, where our CEO Sundar Pichai <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-latin-america/our-commitment-latam-digital-future/">announced</a> a five-year, $1.2 billion commitment to Latin America. Here’s how that will unfold in Brazil:</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3 data-block-key="l8wtf">Reinforcing Brazil as an innovation hub</h3><p data-block-key="7k3nd">In January, we announced our goal to increase our engineering workforce in the country. At today’s event, we shared our plans to open a new multidisciplinary engineering center in São Paulo. Located on the São Paulo University campus, the new center will be part of the <a href="https://www.ipt.br/openexperience/">IPT Open Experience</a>, a program created by the Technological Research Institute (IPT) of the State of São Paulo to promote innovation.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="A 3D rendering of an office building with three floors, a large staircase and various outdoor spaces" class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/3D_Rendering_New_Engineering_Center_ZsZdBZ.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="8vdhf">A 3D render of the new multidisciplinary engineering center in São Paulo</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="l8wtf">The Google São Paulo Engineering Center, which should be complete at the end of 2024, will accommodate up to 400 Googlers from various technical areas. Initially, this new hub will host Google engineers working on areas like privacy, security and safety. They will join teams focused on delivering simple user protection and controls to help people stay safe online.</p><p data-block-key="c9n9d">This important work happens both inside and outside of Google. So in partnership with our Google Safety Engineering Center (GSEC), we're launching a dedicated outreach program for content responsibility in Brazil — engaging with tech experts, educators, regulators and key opinion formers to discuss our approach to content responsibility and online safety, and provide more transparency into our work.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3 data-block-key="l8wtf">Using technology in service of recovery</h3><p data-block-key="fit9t">Being online is essential for any business to grow, and even more so to recover from the pandemic. According to our <a href="http://g.co/impactoeconomico">most recent Economic Impact Report</a> from consulting firm AlphaBeta, thousands of businesses, nonprofits, publishers, creators and developers relied on Google Search, Google Ads, Google AdSense, Google Play and YouTube to generate US$19.4 billion in economic impact in Brazil in 2021.</p><p data-block-key="4lo6m">When it comes to selling products or services in physical stores, it's important for businesses to keep their online information up to date. We’re continuing to experiment with <a href="https://blog.google/technology/ai/duplex-helpful-updates/">Duplex</a>, our AI technology for natural voice conversations, to call Brazilian businesses and update their hours in their business profile on Maps. All calls are conducted respecting local privacy laws.</p><p data-block-key="97ci5">Another way to help people in times of recovery is to connect them with the information they need. According to the latest <a href="https://olheparaafome.com.br/">report by research network Rede Penssan</a>, hunger affects more than 33 million Brazilians today. So we partnered with <a href="https://www.acaodacidadania.org.br/">Ação Cidadania</a> to make it easier for Brazilians to find reliable information about soup kitchens and food banks on Search and Maps, with 1,000 currently pinned across the country.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--4 h-c-grid__col--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-4 h-c-grid__col--offset-3"><video alt="BR Food Banks" autoplay="" class="article-image__media" loop="" muted="" playsinline="" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/original_videos/keywordgif.mp4" tabindex="0" title="An animated mobile view of a soup kitchen on Maps, featuring a photo of two women preparing dozens of meals" type="video/mp4">Video format not supported</video></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="yl9rm">Brazilians can now find soup kitchens and food banks on Search and Maps</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3 data-block-key="l8wtf">Supporting digital inclusion</h3><p data-block-key="3sluf">Since 2017, we’ve invested over 1.6 billion reais to strengthen our technical infrastructure in Brazil, including our subsea cables and cloud region in São Paulo. All these projects aim to improve the quality of digital services for Brazilians and support the growth of our Cloud business. And as our employee base grows, our local Cloud team will move to a new office in São Paulo city in 2023.</p><p data-block-key="95s5q">To help people and entrepreneurs make the most of this infrastructure, we need to equip them with knowledge and skills. This is especially important for job seekers, as Brazil currently has 11.9 million unemployed people. Today, we announced a commitment to provide 500,000 <a href="https://cresca.withgoogle.com/intl/pt-br/certificates">Google Career Certificate</a> scholarships over the next four years. This year, we’ll offer 30,000 of them in partnership with <a href="https://portal.ciee.org.br/">Centro de Integração Empresa-Escola (CIEE)</a>, helping Brazilians get access to jobs in high-growth fields like data analysis and UX design. We’ve also expanded <a href="http://g.co/cloud/CapacitaMais">Capacita+</a>, our educational content hub for cloud computing.</p></div></div><div class="block-video"><div class="h-c-page h-c-page--mobile-full-bleed"><div class="h-c-grid"><div class="h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col-l--10 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-1"><div class="article-module uni-article-video uni-article-video--body" data-component="uni-article-yt-player" data-page-title="" data-video-id="uUzV1THB1h0"><div class="uni-article-video__embed-container hidden"><div id="uni-article-yt-player-uUzV1THB1h0"></div></div><figure><a class="h-c-video h-c-video--marquee uni-article-video__custom-wrapper" role="link" tabindex="0"><div class="uni-article-video__aspect-image"><img alt="A video of Patricia Alves talking about her professional journey" src="//img.youtube.com/vi/uUzV1THB1h0/maxresdefault.jpg"/><div class="uni-article-video__dimmer"></div><svg class="uni-article-video__play-button--active" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_play_button_no_hole"></use></svg><svg class="uni-article-video__play-button" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_play_button"></use></svg><div class="uni-article-video__duration loading"><svg class="uni-article-video__duration-icon" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_duration"></use></svg><span class="uni-article-video__duration-time">10:25</span></div></div></a><figcaption class="uni-article-video__caption h-c-page"><p aria-hidden="true">Meet Patricia Alves, who found a new career path through Google Cloud’s learning programs</p></figcaption></figure></div></div></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="l8wtf">This builds on the work Google.org and the InterAmerican Development Bank have been <a href="https://site.jaamericas.org/new-blog/2019/10/7/ja-americas-launches-first-regional-partnership-with-google">supporting since 2019</a> with JA Brazil to bring Google Career Certificates to over 2,000 young Brazilians across the country. Additionally, we recently <a href="https://blog.google/intl/pt-br/novidades/iniciativas/googleorg-apoiando-iniciativas-contra/">renewed</a> our commitment with <a href="https://institutorme.org.br/">Instituto Rede Mulher Empreendedora</a> (RME) through a new $2 million Google.org grant to train 200,000 women all over the country on entrepreneurship, with a focus on Northern Brazil. This complements our new Google for Startups scholarship program in partnership with <a href="https://www.vamoquevamo.org/">Instituto Vamo Que Vamo</a> to train 200 young Black people, mostly women, in software development.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3 data-block-key="l8wtf">Promoting a more sustainable planet</h3><p data-block-key="7pj3t">Each day, more people ask themselves what they can do to help protect our planet from environmental threats like climate change. Many of these questions start in Google Search. So in partnership with the United Nations, we’ve released an information panel that appears above results for climate change-related queries. In addition to sharing basic facts about the topic, the panel also offers tips for living a more sustainable life.</p><p data-block-key="ek2cs">As a technology company, we can also help others use digital solutions to increase the scale and impact of their work. Through a $500,000 Google.org commitment ($250,000 in cash grants and $250,000 in Ad Grants), we’ll support <a href="https://www.nature.org/en-us/about-us/where-we-work/latin-america/brazil/">The Nature Conservancy</a> (TNC) to develop solutions to protect biodiversity in the Amazon rainforest.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3 data-block-key="21wgs">Reaffirming our mission</h3><p data-block-key="cdm5k">Our Google for Brazil event was a special moment to demonstrate our long-term commitment to the country and celebrate Brazil's unique contributions to the world. In fact, to cap off the day, we revealed a new <a href="http://g.co/gilbertogil">Google Arts &amp; Culture collection dedicated to Gilberto Gil</a>, one of Brazil's best-known musicians. It's the platform’s first large retrospective dedicated to a living artist, unpacking Gil’s life, career and influences on Brazilian and global culture on the month of his 80th birthday.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="Illustration of Gilberto Gil surrounded by icons representing London, Benin, New York, Los Angeles, Salvador, Jamaica, Rio de Janeiro and Japan" class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/GilbertoGil_-_Google_Arts__Culture_1.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="nvwyv"><a href="https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/CgEtWLx0M274JA">Gilberto Gil's Cultural Roadtrip Map, illustrated by artist Raiana Britto</a></p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="l8wtf">Through all of these initiatives, we are reaffirming our mission to help Brazilians use technology to build a more inclusive, innovative, sustainable, democratic and equitable future.</p></div></div></body></html>Tue, 14 Jun 2022 15:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-latin-america/renewing-our-commitment-to-brazil/Arts & CultureGoogle in Latin AmericaGoogle.orgSafety & SecurityNext Billion UsersarticleRenewing our commitment to BrazilAt Google for Brazil 2022, we announced a series of investments, initiatives and product features for the country.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Hero_16.9_01_yeg4EU8.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-latin-america/renewing-our-commitment-to-brazil/Fabio CoelhoVP & Country Manager for BrazilOur commitment to Latin America’s digital futurehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-latin-america/our-commitment-latam-digital-future/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="zp6qy"><i>Editor’s note: You can also read this blog in</i> <a href="https://blog.google/intl/es-419/noticias-de-la-empresa/de-google/nuestro-compromiso-con-el-futuro-digital-de-america-latina/"><i>Spanish</i></a><i>and</i> <a href="https://blog.google/intl/pt-br/novidades/por-dentro-do-google/nosso-compromisso-com-o-futuro-digital-da-america-latina"><i>Portuguese</i></a><i>.</i></p><p data-block-key="42b11">I’ve always believed technology is a powerful enabler for businesses and communities. During the pandemic, we’ve seen how digital tools have helped create jobs and make economies more resilient and sustainable. This is especially true in emerging markets, where an entrepreneurial spirit and new pathways for innovation can unleash enormous economic opportunity.</p><p data-block-key="1qa82">At Google, we see that potential today in Latin America. Communities have been hit hard by the pandemic, and closing digital access gaps will be vital to an inclusive recovery. At the same time, according to a <a href="https://impact.economist.com/perspectives/technology-innovation/seizing-opportunity-future-ai-latin-america">new report</a> from the Economist, increased investment and a policy focus on AI technologies can unlock new opportunities, from health care and sustainable agriculture to financial services and more.</p><p data-block-key="21nir">As we shared in our <a href="https://blog.google/documents/94/The_Digital_Sprinters_FINAL.pdf/">Digital Sprinters report</a>, digital transformation will require investment by governments and the private sector in infrastructure, people, technological innovation and public policies. In Latin America, realizing the full potential of digital technologies could generate an annual <a href="https://alphabeta.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/201113_fa-main-report-gem-pages-os.pdf">economic impact</a> of up to $1.37 trillion by 2030 in six of the region’s largest economies, or 23% of these countries’ combined GDPs.</p><p data-block-key="6de1o">We’ve been investing in Latin America over the last 17 years, and today we’re announcing a five-year, $1.2 billion commitment to the region. We will focus on four areas where we believe we can best help the region to thrive: digital infrastructure, digital skills, entrepreneurship and inclusive, sustainable communities.</p><h3 data-block-key="23lu0">Investing in digital infrastructure</h3></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="A subsea cable runs across the beach and into the ocean in Chile." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Curie_6_cyMUKk0.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="jiitp">Curie landed in Valparaíso, Chile in 2019 and was the first subsea cable to connect to Chile in 19 years.</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="zp6qy">We’ve been investing to improve connectivity and increase Latin America’s access to digital services, including Google products like Search, Gmail and YouTube, as well as Google Cloud. The <a href="https://cloud.google.com/blog/products/infrastructure/announcing-the-firmina-subsea-cable">Firmina subsea cable</a>, named after Brazilian abolitionist Maria Firmina dos Reis, will be the world's largest subsea cable, capable of operating from a single power source at one end of the cable if needed. When completed in 2023, it will run from the U.S. to Argentina, with additional landings in Brazil and Uruguay. Firmina follows three other significant cable investments in Latin America — Monet, Tannat and Curie — which together bring more reliable connectivity to the region.</p><p data-block-key="ckjdh">Our Google Cloud Regions in Santiago, Chile, and São Paulo, Brazil, are giving businesses access to compute power and services that enable them to succeed in the digital economy. For example, <a href="https://www.tembici.com.br/">Tembici</a>, a Brazilian startup that offers bike sharing services in major cities across Latin America, runs its operations on Google Cloud — supporting its regional expansion.</p><p data-block-key="e8344">Looking ahead, our Cloud Regions will continue to help more organizations accelerate their digital transformation and build towards long-term growth. We will also increase our engineering footprint in Brazil. These new roles — with a focus on essential areas like privacy and security — will help us create better products for the region and the world.</p><h3 data-block-key="9kb0r">Expanding opportunity through digital skills</h3><p data-block-key="fdcol">Digital skills are key to unlocking opportunities for the next generation. Through our Grow with Google program and Google.org grantees, we’ve trained nearly eight million people across Latin America in digital skills since 2017.</p><p data-block-key="42cak">To build on this momentum, today we’re announcing that we’ll provide <a href="https://grow.google/intl/ssa/google-certificates">Google Career Certificate</a> scholarships to one million people in Latin America. This training will help people access well-paying jobs in high-growth fields.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="In photo on left, women look at the camera at a Grow with Google event. On photo on right, a large crowd attends an event in a conference room as a person speaks on stage." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/9FEA5qDtkgosCdt.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="jiitp">Our Grow with Google program has trained nearly eight million people in Latin American in digital skills since 2017.</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3 data-block-key="zp6qy">Supporting startups and small businesses</h3><p data-block-key="3n877">There is huge momentum behind tech entrepreneurship throughout Latin America. When we opened our Google for Startups campus in Brazil in 2016, there were no “unicorns,” startups valued at $1 billion or more, in the region. Today, there are 35, including 13 unicorns that have been part of Google for Startups programs. With investment, resources and training from Google for Startups, we have supported more than 450 startups in the region. These startups have gone on to raise more than $9 billion in investments, creating 25,000 jobs.</p><p data-block-key="9g3bp">One example is <a href="https://startup.google.com/stories/oliverpets/">Oliver Pets</a>, an Argentinian startup that, with support from Google for Startups, was able to launch virtual veterinary care through their app and expand to Mexico and other parts of Latin America.</p><p data-block-key="na81">We’re also seeing how our products and services are helping small businesses thrive in difficult times. When Fátima Álvarez, the co-founder of Mexican startup <a href="https://someonesomewhere.com/">Someone Somewhere</a>, closed her retail shops during the pandemic, she turned to digital tools like Google Workspace and Google Ads to keep her clothing business running online.</p><h3 data-block-key="5jrev">Building more inclusive and sustainable communities</h3><p data-block-key="1j62g">Through our philanthropic arm, Google.org, we’ve been supporting organizations like <a href="https://www.laboratoria.la/">Laboratoria</a> in Peru, <a href="https://www.colnodo.apc.org/">Asociación Colnodo</a> in Colombia and <a href="https://institutorme.org.br/">Instituto Rede Mulher Empreendedora</a> in Brazil to make sure underserved communities also benefit from digital transformation.</p><p data-block-key="df4p3">Today Google.org is announcing $300 million over the next five years, comprised of $50 million in cash grants and $250 million in donated ads, to support nonprofits focused on areas like sustainability and economic opportunity for women and young people. For example, a $2 million Google.org grant to <a href="https://promujer.org/">Pro Mujer</a> will help Indigenous women-led businesses in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras access microloans and digital skills training.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="In photo on left two people with laptops smile at the camera. In photo on right, people attend a graduation ceremony and are raising their arms as they cheer." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/4wyJKoMeFuhpcVB.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="jiitp">Through Google.org, we’ve supported Laboratoria, a nonprofit in Peru, to help women access digital skills training.</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="rj1f6">Across these commitments, we are partnering with governments, entrepreneurs and businesses to support sustainable, resilient and equitable growth. It’s exciting to see Latin America emerge as a hub of innovation, and we look forward to creating even more economic opportunities for those who call it home.</p></div></div></body></html>Thu, 09 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-latin-america/our-commitment-latam-digital-future/A message from our CEOGoogle in Latin AmericaNext Billion UsersarticleOur commitment to Latin America’s digital futureThis commitment will help accelerate digital transformation and economic growth across Latin America.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/V5-Asset-Summit-Americas-E_LIaQz9D.max-600x600.pngGooglehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-latin-america/our-commitment-latam-digital-future/Sundar PichaiCEO of Google and AlphabetGoogle Translate learns 24 new languageshttps://blog.google/products/translate/24-new-languages/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="4uazy">For years, Google Translate has helped break down language barriers and connect communities all over the world. And we want to make this possible for even more people — especially those whose languages aren’t represented in most technology. So today we’ve added 24 languages to Translate, now supporting a total of 133 used around the globe.</p><p data-block-key="adr67">Over 300 million people speak these newly added languages — like Mizo, used by around 800,000 people in the far northeast of India, and Lingala, used by over 45 million people across Central Africa. As part of this update, Indigenous languages of the Americas (Quechua, Guarani and Aymara) and an English dialect (Sierra Leonean Krio) have also been added to Translate for the first time.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt='The Google Translate bar translates the phrase "Our mission: to enable everyone, everywhere to understand the world and express themselves across languages" into different languages.' class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/original_images/Translate_New-Languages.gif" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="d1el0">Translate's mission translated into some of our newly added languages</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="4uazy">Here’s a complete list of the new languages now available in Google Translate:</p><ul><li data-block-key="f6knl"><b>Assamese</b>, used by about 25 million people in Northeast India</li><li data-block-key="dau5c"><b>Aymara</b>, used by about two million people in Bolivia, Chile and Peru</li><li data-block-key="64os2"><b>Bambara</b>, used by about 14 million people in Mali</li><li data-block-key="c3iis"><b>Bhojpuri</b>, used by about 50 million people in northern India, Nepal and Fiji</li><li data-block-key="2dfs5"><b>Dhivehi</b>, used by about 300,000 people in the Maldives</li><li data-block-key="fb4fc"><b>Dogri</b>, used by about three million people in northern India</li><li data-block-key="9tr4g"><b>Ewe</b>, used by about seven million people in Ghana and Togo</li><li data-block-key="2pcs4"><b>Guarani</b>, used by about seven million people in Paraguay and Bolivia, Argentina and Brazil</li><li data-block-key="anklc"><b>Ilocano</b>, used by about 10 million people in northern Philippines</li><li data-block-key="5kv0r"><b>Konkani</b>, used by about two million people in Central India</li><li data-block-key="3lquf"><b>Krio</b>, used by about four million people in Sierra Leone</li><li data-block-key="b6k5n"><b>Kurdish (Sorani)</b>, used by about 15 million people in Iraq and Iran</li><li data-block-key="14aq9"><b>Lingala</b>, used by about 45 million people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Central African Republic, Angola and the Republic of South Sudan</li><li data-block-key="83bb"><b>Luganda</b>, used by about 20 million people in Uganda and Rwanda</li><li data-block-key="a831f"><b>Maithili</b>, used by about 34 million people in northern India</li><li data-block-key="f1cj"><b>Meiteilon (Manipuri)</b>, used by about two million people in Northeast India</li><li data-block-key="hld5"><b>Mizo</b>, used by about 830,000 people in Northeast India</li><li data-block-key="g5d6"><b>Oromo</b>, used by about 37 million people in Ethiopia and Kenya</li><li data-block-key="3ia76"><b>Quechua</b>, used by about 10 million people in Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador and surrounding countries</li><li data-block-key="eqcsd"><b>Sanskrit</b>, used by about 20,000 people in India</li><li data-block-key="5udlv"><b>Sepedi</b>, used by about 14 million people in South Africa</li><li data-block-key="2clhp"><b>Tigrinya</b>, used by about eight million people in Eritrea and Ethiopia</li><li data-block-key="75crg"><b>Tsonga</b>, used by about seven million people in Eswatini, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe</li><li data-block-key="2nn1f"><b>Twi</b>, used by about 11 million people in Ghana</li></ul><p data-block-key="ftfro">This is also a technical milestone for Google Translate. These are the first languages we’ve added using Zero-Shot Machine Translation, where a machine learning model only sees monolingual text — meaning, it learns to translate into another language without ever seeing an example. While this technology is impressive, it isn't perfect. And we’ll keep improving these models to deliver the same experience you’re used to with a Spanish or German translation, for example. If you want to dig into the technical details, check out our <a href="http://ai.googleblog.com/2022/05/24-new-languages-google-translate.html">Google AI blog post</a> and <a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/2205.03983.pdf">research paper</a>.</p><p data-block-key="elebt">We’re grateful to the many native speakers, professors and linguists who worked with us on this latest update and kept us inspired with their passion and enthusiasm. If you want to help us support your language in a future update, contribute evaluations or translations through <a href="https://support.google.com/translate/answer/2534530?hl=en">Translate Contribute</a>.</p></div></div></body></html>Wed, 11 May 2022 17:16:00 +0000https://blog.google/products/translate/24-new-languages/TranslateNext Billion UsersDiversity and InclusionAIarticleGoogle Translate learns 24 new languagesGoogle Translate adds 24 new languages, including Indigenous languages of the Americas and languages from around Africa and India.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/io_2022_heroes_translate-11.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/products/translate/24-new-languages/Isaac CaswellSenior Software Engineer, Google TranslateAn anthology of insights, for a more inclusive internethttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/anthology-insights-more-inclusive-internet/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>Between 2015 and 2022, <a href="https://datareportal.com/reports/digital-2022-global-overview-report">nearly 3 billion people</a> worldwide got online for the first time — and <a href="https://cybersecurityventures.com/how-many-internet-users-will-the-world-have-in-2022-and-in-2030/">changed the internet in the process</a>. These <a href="http://nextbillionusers.google/novice-internet-users">novice internet users</a> experience the web differently from those who came online before. Almost all of them connect on their phones, they speak over 7,000 languages, and they often prefer to interact with the internet using video or their voice. For Google, understanding their needs has helped us build better products — for novice users, and for everyone else.</p><p>In 2015, we launched our <a href="https://nextbillionusers.google/">Next Billion Users (NBU) initiative</a>, with a focus on making technology helpful, relevant and inclusive for people new to the internet. Since then, our NBU teams have used deep research and product development to improve our existing products (creating offline versions of Maps, for example) and create new ones, like <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.apps.nbu.files&amp;hl=en_US&amp;gl=US">Files</a> (a storage cleaning and offline file sharing app). With Android (Go edition), we’ve adapted our mobile operating system for entry-level devices, and we built Google Pay to advance financial inclusion in India.</p><p>Today, building a better internet is more important than ever. We’re committed to playing our part in nurturing a <a href="https://www.blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/more-inclusive-global-digital-economy/">more inclusive global digital economy</a>. But we also want to share the lessons we’ve learned over the past seven years to support the wider industry— which is why we’re releasing <a href="http://nextbillionusers.google/a-z/">an anthology</a> of our key NBU insights to date.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="A man and a lady are standing in the fields at a farm. The man is holding up a leaf while the lady has a smartphone in her hands. Both are looking intently at the smartphone." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Ag8GCwdF8gHTwPn.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>This compilation reflects one of the core principles of our NBU work: when we build with the next billion users, we make progress towards an internet that works better for everyone. In the anthology, our insights are listed across 26 topics from A to Z in the Roman alphabet (A for access, F for financial inclusion and Y for youth, and so on).</p><p>We’re launching our anthology this month to celebrate the invention of the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2019/mar/12/tim-berners-lee-on-30-years-of-the-web-if-we-dream-a-little-we-can-get-the-web-we-want">World Wide Web</a>, one of the most significant technologies in modern history. To mark the occasion, we want to highlight three topics in particular — Women, Ecosystem and Building Inclusive Products — or WEB.</p><p><b>Women</b></p><p>Women make up the majority of the next billion users, and it will take a sustained, coordinated effort from the technology industry, governments and nonprofit organizations to make the internet more gender-equitable. Our <a href="https://services.google.com/fh/files/misc/toward_gender_equity_online.pdf">research has found</a> that women often face higher barriers to internet access than men, as well as threats to their safety and privacy online. Yet a rising female population could have a profoundly positive impact on the internet economy — as <a href="https://nextbillionusers.google/our-research/africa-internet-future-2020/#">studies in Africa</a> have shown. Together with our partners, we run global programs like <a href="https://www.womentechmakers.com/">Women Techmakers</a>, which provide visibility, community, and resources for women in technology.</p><p><b>Ecosystem</b></p><p>No one organization can build a more inclusive internet alone. In all our NBU efforts, we’ve prioritized <a href="https://nextbillionusers.google/our-research/">sharing our research openly</a> and forming partnerships with others who are working towards the same goals. One example is our work with India’s Jio to create the <a href="https://blog.google/intl/en-in/company-news/outreach-initiatives/introducing-jiophone-next-made-india-smartphone/">JioPhone Next</a>, an affordable, made-for-India smartphone that’s enabling millions of people across the country to experience the internet. We also welcome and support the growing role that governments are playing in developing nationwide and regional strategies to increase digital inclusion. That includes Google’s own partnerships with governments to <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/google-for-africa/">advance Africa’s digital transformation</a>.</p><p><b>Building inclusive products</b></p><p>We’ve learned that to build better products, we have to challenge our own intuition and assumptions as technology-makers. That starts with deep, immersive research — spending time in communities to understand the environment, concerns and aspirations of the people we’re building for. We see the impact we want when we build <i>with</i> new users, not just <i>for</i> them, as with the brainstorming and design process for <a href="http://nextbillionusers.google/a-z/motorcycle-mode-in-maps/">Motorcycle Mode in Maps</a>. And we’ve learned that there’s no such thing as a typical user. For example, many families in NBU countries <a href="https://nextbillionusers.google/our-research/toward-gender-equity-online/#">share their mobile devices</a> with one another — yet device privacy and account settings are still mostly built on the principle of “one person, one account”.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="A group of four young adults are having a meal at an alfresco restaurant. One of them is a bespectacled boy who is holding a smartphone in his hands and chatting with his friend." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/cNQxYCF33X3ACdi.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>Our work with novice internet users goes to the heart of Google's founding mission — to make the world’s information universally accessible — and together we will shape a more equitable, inclusive internet. We designed <a href="https://nextbillionusers.google/a-z/">this anthology</a> of NBU insights to inspire others to join us in building for everyone, everywhere.</p></div></div></body></html>Tue, 15 Mar 2022 05:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/anthology-insights-more-inclusive-internet/Next Billion UsersarticleAn anthology of insights, for a more inclusive internetWe’re releasing a print and digital volume that brings together our insights from seven years of building a more inclusive internethttps://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/ALE_2527.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/anthology-insights-more-inclusive-internet/Peeyush RanjanGM and VP, Next Billion Users initiativeAfrican developers: creating opportunities and building for the futurehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/african-developers-creating-opportunities-and-building-future/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p data-block-key="nda0a">Every day, African businesses harness ingenuity to empower their communities. African software developers are an engine for digital transformation in local economies across the continent, and there’s no one better to solve challenges than local developers, founders, and entrepreneurs. And as African startup funding reaches unprecedented levels (growing by over 2.5x in 2021 over the previous year), understanding Africa’s developer landscape is key to support the growth of these startups.</p><p data-block-key="a365s">For the second year in a row, Google published <a href="https://nextbillionusers.google/our-research/africa-developer-community-2021/">the Africa Developer Ecosystem report</a> to map Africa’s developer landscape. We expanded this edition of the report to include year-on-year growth analysis, tech ecosystem components and key growth factors. The research was conducted in 16 African markets (Algeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Tunisia, Uganda) and the findings were extrapolated to the rest of the continent.</p><p data-block-key="5naq8">Here are the five key takeaways from our study:</p><p data-block-key="nou9c"><br/><b>1. Africa’s developer population is growing across the continent.</b></p><p data-block-key="phn67">We found that COVID-19 has continued to shape both the tech community at large and the nuances of the developer experience. Despite a contracting economy, the pool of professional developers increased by 3.8% to make up 0.4% of the continent’s non-agricultural workforce. Salaries and compensation also rose, and more developers secured full-time jobs.</p><p data-block-key="u9gcu"></p><p data-block-key="9v81z"><b>2. VC investment in African startups rebounded as the digital economy expanded.</b></p><p data-block-key="re71n">As local businesses transitioned online across the continent, they boosted the need for web development and data engineering skills. African startups raised over $4bn in 2021, 2.5x times more than in 2020, with fintech startups making up over half of this funding. The shift to remote work also created more employment opportunities across time zones and continents for African developers while lifting the pay for senior talent. As a result, international companies are now recruiting African developers at record rates.</p><p data-block-key="9rhd2"></p><p data-block-key="qjdsy"><b>3. Learners, junior developers, as well as underrepresented groups including women, need more support.</b></p><p data-block-key="1ds8z">These groups faced challenges exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Without access to in-person education — or affordable, reliable internet access and at-home equipment — they struggled to make gains last year. This can be seen in how the gender gap between men developers and women developers widened: there are 2.5% fewer women developers in the workforce than there were in 2020.</p><p data-block-key="w6rl3"></p><p data-block-key="pl8rl"><b>4. Educators, technology companies and governments are undertaking initiatives to strengthen the developer pipeline.</b></p><p data-block-key="l6jms">Educators, tech companies and governments can help developers succeed by improving internet access, education and business support. Bootcamps and certifications, run as part of formal and informal education, are working to bridge the vocational training gap between traditional education and employment moving forward. Global technology companies are investing in digital skill building across the continent to improve job readiness and alleviate the tech talent bottleneck. Governments can also play a vital role in strengthening the developer pipeline by investing in both internet access and education.</p><p data-block-key="3uy37"></p><p data-block-key="2oe6d"><b>5. Nigeria is a striking example of the symbiotic relationship between digital transformation and developer growth in Africa.</b></p><p data-block-key="350bj">The developer ecosystem in Nigeria is thriving, thanks to strong demand for developer talent, significant support from big tech, and Nigerian startups raising the largest total amount of funding on the continent in 2021. Nigeria had the highest number of new developers of all countries surveyed, with 5,000 additional developers joining Nigeria's developer population in 2021. As countries like Nigeria continue to transform, they will unlock more opportunities for developers, who in turn, grow the economy.<br/></p><p data-block-key="9jhhd">To support the continued growth of Africa’s developers, technology companies, educators and governments are tackling local challenges through innovative partnerships and programs. Google is committed to supporting developers at each stage of their journey through regional developer training, community, and mentorship programs, including <a href="https://developers.google.com/community/gdg">Google Developer Groups</a>, <a href="https://developers.google.com/community/gdsc">Google Developer Student Clubs</a>, <a href="https://www.womentechmakers.com/">Women Techmakers</a> and <a href="https://developers.google.com/community/experts">Google Developer Experts</a>.</p></div></div></body></html>Mon, 21 Feb 2022 16:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/african-developers-creating-opportunities-and-building-future/Google in AfricaNext Billion UsersDevelopersarticleAfrican developers: creating opportunities and building for the futureThe Africa Developer Ecosystem Report brings missing data to measure the potential of Africa’s developer ecosystem and analyze year-on-year growth.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Google_NBU_Africa_Developers_Report_Socials_.max-600x600_ftZ0z0V.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/african-developers-creating-opportunities-and-building-future/Nitin GajriaManaging Director, Google Sub-Saharan AfricaA digital decade for Southeast Asiahttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/sea-digital-decade/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>Southeast Asia’s digital decade is here. Technology has been critical in helping Southeast Asians get through the COVID-19 pandemic. Now, as <a href="https://economysea.withgoogle.com/">the latest eConomy Southeast Asia report</a> shows, the digital economy is poised to play an even bigger role in the region’s future than we had imagined.</p><p>Last year, we saw Southeast Asia’s <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/e-conomy-sea-2020/?_ga=2.12611056.632479490.1636351478-117820625.1564981122">resilience in the face of the pandemic</a>, as people turned to the internet to meet their everyday needs in new ways. This year’s report — published today by Google, Temasek and Bain &amp; Company — shows a resurgence, and looks ahead to a “roaring 20s” where technology will open up exciting new possibilities for hundreds of millions of people across the region.</p><p>We now forecast that the digital economy will reach $174 billion in gross merchandise value by the end of 2021 and pick up pace to hit $363 billion by 2025, well above last year’s estimate of $300 billion. For the first time, we also make a 2030 forecast— projecting that the digital economy could reach a value of $1 trillion by the end of the decade. Growth on that scale would see Southeast Asia help define the future of technology globally.</p></div></div><div class="block-video"><div class="h-c-page h-c-page--mobile-full-bleed"><div class="h-c-grid"><div class="h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col-l--10 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-1"><div class="article-module uni-article-video uni-article-video--body" data-component="uni-article-yt-player" data-page-title="" data-video-id="6zc7I5pIff4"><div class="uni-article-video__embed-container hidden"><div id="uni-article-yt-player-6zc7I5pIff4"></div></div><figure><a class="h-c-video h-c-video--marquee uni-article-video__custom-wrapper" role="link" tabindex="0"><div class="uni-article-video__aspect-image"><img alt="A video showing the report's key themes for 2021" src="//img.youtube.com/vi/6zc7I5pIff4/maxresdefault.jpg"/><div class="uni-article-video__dimmer"></div><svg class="uni-article-video__play-button--active" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_play_button_no_hole"></use></svg><svg class="uni-article-video__play-button" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_play_button"></use></svg><div class="uni-article-video__duration loading"><svg class="uni-article-video__duration-icon" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_duration"></use></svg><span class="uni-article-video__duration-time">10:25</span></div></div></a></figure></div></div></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>Here are some of the key themes from the 2021 report — and a look ahead to the enablers that will ensure Southeast Asia reaches its enormous potential.</p><p></p><h3><b>Southeast Asians continue to surge online</b></h3><p>Of the region’s population of 589 million, 440 million people (or 75%) are online — including 40 million who started using the internet for the first time in 2021. About 350 million Southeast Asians are ‘digital consumers’, meaning they’ve bought at least one online service. Since the pandemic began, the region has added 60 million more digital consumers. And the shift online appears to be here to stay: nine out of 10 people who started using a new online service in 2020 continued using it in 2021.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="An infographic showing that the number of internet users in Southeast Asia has grown from 360 million in 2019 to 400 million in 2020 to 440 million in 2021." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/5mS9BUUFuQyNqCx.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3><b>A new wave of digital merchants emerges</b></h3><p>The internet has been critical in helping Southeast Asia’s small businesses get through the pandemic — and plan for the future. In preparing the 2021 report, we spoke to 3,000 digital merchants (small businesses that use digital tools, usually in food services or retail). We were struck by what a positive experience they’d had since moving online. Today, 90% of these merchants accept digital payments and one in three believe they wouldn’t have survived the pandemic without going online. Over the next five years, eight out of 10 merchants anticipate that more than half their sales will come from online sources.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="An infographic showing that 84% of digital merchants surveyed agree digital platforms create more jobs, 84% agree they improve people’s livelihood, 87% agree sales would have declined or there would have been no sales during the pandemic, and 88% agree digital platforms bring positive benefits for their company." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/8JKYpivm5vKBnRC.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3><b>E-commerce leads the digital economy’s resurgence</b></h3><p>The rise of e-commerce is at the heart of the regional digital economy’s renewed growth, as people use the internet to buy more and more everyday products and services. The report estimates the e-commerce sector could pass $120 billion in GMV by the end of 2021 and reach $234 billion by 2025. Food delivery is also growing fast, with 71% of all internet users ordering meals online, and online media is increasingly popular — helped by the growing popularity of gaming.</p><p>At the same time, three emerging sectors are growing faster because of COVID-19: health, education and financial technology. As people look for greater convenience and accessibility, these sectors are expected to keep expanding and become a significant part of the digital economy by 2030.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="A girl in a blue school uniform sits on the front step of a raised building made of wood and corrugated iron. She is typing on a laptop." class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/GettyImages-1331137050.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3><b>Funding fuels opportunity</b></h3><p>Across the digital economy, investment is on track towards a record high in 2021. The value of deals in the region was $11.5 billion in the first half of 2021, compared with $11.6 billion in the whole of 2020. Most funding (about 60%) is going to e-commerce and digital financial services, but the growth of health technology has caught investors’ attention: funding for the sector rose to a record high of $1.1 billion in the first six months of the year, more than the 2020 total of $800 million. And there is a pool of $14.2 billion of capital available for founders looking for backing to take their ideas forward.</p><p></p><h2><b>Looking ahead: a digital decade for everyone</b></h2><p>A $1 trillion digital economy in 2030 would mean more widely-accessible online services, new jobs and stronger businesses. It would also see Southeast Asia shaping advances in technology for the wider Asia-Pacific region and beyond, as a bellwether of global digital trends. But to make sure the digital decade benefits as many people as possible, we have to focus on the right enablers. The priorities for the years ahead include getting regulatory frameworks right, putting data infrastructure in place, and ensuring the digital economy develops in a way that’s equitable — for example, by protecting the interests of gig workers and safeguarding online privacy.</p><p>Google’s commitment is to help build a digital economy that can benefit everyone in Southeast Asia by 2030. We want to play our part in creating responsible growth and providing economic opportunities for current and future generations. We’ll continue to build the future of the internet in and for this region, provide inclusive, safe access for the communities we serve, and be a partner to Southeast Asia’s businesses and governments on the way to a bigger, better digital economy.</p></div></div></body></html>Wed, 10 Nov 2021 02:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/sea-digital-decade/EntrepreneursGoogle in AsiaNext Billion UsersSmall BusinessarticleA digital decade for Southeast AsiaThe latest eConomy Southeast Asia report shows the region’s digital economy soaring towards a value of $1 trillion by 2030.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/GettyImages-88559422.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/sea-digital-decade/Stephanie DavisVice PresidentSoutheast AsiaOur $1 billion investment in Africa's digital transformationhttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/google-for-africa/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><i>Editor’s note: Today at Google for Africa, Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced a $1 billion investment in Africa over five years to cover a range of initiatives, from improved connectivity to investments in startups. Below is an edited transcript of his remarks. Watch the full event above or on</i> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJw_gOAnAtE"><i>YouTube</i></a><i>.</i></p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>There is so much momentum happening across Africa, and we’re excited to showcase it at our first Google for Africa event.</p><p>Of course, there are also significant challenges. The pandemic continues to deeply impact communities across the continent and around the world. I hope everyone is taking care during these difficult times.</p><p>One thing we’ve seen is how technology can be a lifeline, whether you are a parent seeking information to keep your family healthy, a student learning virtually or an entrepreneur connecting with new customers and markets. Being helpful in these moments is at the core of our mission: to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.</p><p>Expanding opportunity through technology is deeply personal to me. That’s because I grew up without much access to it. Every new technology — from the rotary phone to the television — changed my family’s life for the better. That’s why I’m a technology optimist. I believe in how people can harness it for good.<br/></p><p>I see so many examples across Africa today, whether it’s startups like <a href="https://www.tambuahealth.com/">Tambua Health</a> that are using machine learning to help doctors diagnose and treat diseases, or entrepreneurs like Tunji, whom I had the chance to meet when I was in Lagos in 2017. His company, <a href="https://gidimo.com/">Gidi Mobile</a>, is helping low-income students in Nigeria access online learning.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="Sundar Pichai and Gidi Mobile’s Tunji Adegbesan at Google for Nigeria in 2017" class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Google-126_1.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p>Sundar Pichai and Gidi Mobile’s Tunji Adegbesan at Google for Nigeria in 2017</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>Increasingly we are seeing innovation begin in Africa, and then spread throughout the world. For example, people in Africa were among the first to access the internet through a phone rather than a computer. And mobile money was ubiquitous in Kenya before it was adopted by the world.</p><p>This momentum will only increase as 300 million people come online in Africa over the next five years. Many of them are young, creative and entrepreneurial, and they’re ready to drive new innovation and opportunity across the region.<br/></p><p>It’s been incredible to see the rapid pace of change in a short amount of time, and be a partner on that journey. Since we opened our first offices in Africa, we’ve enabled 100 million Africans to access the internet for the first time and empowered millions of businesses and creators with digital tools.</p><p>A big focus has been on expanding opportunity through digital skills. In 2017, we committed to help 10 million Africans get the digital skills they need to grow their careers and businesses. So far, we’ve trained six million people. We’ve also trained 80,000 developers from every country in Africa and supported more than 80 startups to raise global venture capital funding, creating thousands of jobs.</p><p>In 2018, we opened an artificial intelligence research center in Accra. The team is focused on solving challenges relevant to Africa and the world, like using <a href="https://sites.research.google/open-buildings">AI to map buildings</a> that are hard to detect using traditional tools and adding 200,000 kilometers of roads on Google Maps.</p><p>And we continue to build for Africa’s unique needs. Products like <a href="https://africa.googleblog.com/2018/11/making-smartphones-more-affordable-and.html">Android Go</a> and <a href="https://files.google.com/">Files Go</a> ensure that everyone can have a great smartphone experience. On YouTube, we are supporting Black creators and artists with our Black Voices Fund.</p><p>These are just a few examples of how we're investing in, and building for, Africa. We know there’s more we can do to help bring the benefits of technology to more Africans.<br/></p><p>So today I'm excited to announce that we plan to invest one billion dollars in Africa over five years. It will cover a range of initiatives, from improving connectivity to investing in startups.</p><p>These investments will support the continent’s digital transformation in four key areas:<br/></p><p></p><ul><li>Enabling affordable access and building products for every kind of African user.</li><li>Helping businesses with their digital transformation.</li><li>Investing in entrepreneurs to spur next-generation technologies.</li><li>Supporting nonprofits working to improve lives across Africa.</li></ul><p>As we make these investments, we know we can’t do this alone. We look forward to partnering with African governments, policymakers, educators, entrepreneurs and businesses. We have so much opportunity ahead as Africans shape the next wave of innovation. Thank you for the chance to be a part of it.</p></div></div><div class="block-perspective_qa"><div class="uni-related-article-tout h-c-page" data-component="uni-related-article-tout"><section class="h-c-grid"><a class="uni-related-article-tout__wrapper h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-m--6 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-m--offset-3 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "article lead", "action": "related article - inline", "label": "article: using-ai-to-map-africas-buildings" }' href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/using-ai-to-map-africas-buildings/"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__inner-wrapper"><p class="uni-related-article-tout__eyebrow h-c-eyebrow">Read Article</p><div class="uni-related-article-tout__content-wrapper"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__image-wrapper"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__image" style="background-image: url('https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/BINK_GoogleHero_Open-Buildings_V2b_2096x1182.max-500x500.jpg')"></div></div><div class="uni-related-article-tout__content"><h4 class="uni-related-article-tout__header h-has-bottom-margin">Using AI to map Africa’s buildings</h4><p class="uni-related-article-tout__body">Google's Open Buildings uses AI to provide a digital footprint of buildings.</p><div class="cta module-cta h-c-copy uni-related-article-tout__cta muted"><span class="nowrap">Read Article<svg class="icon h-c-icon" role="presentation"><use xlink:href="#mi-arrow-forward" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"></use></svg></span></div></div></div></div></a></section></div></div></body></html>Wed, 06 Oct 2021 11:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/google-for-africa/A message from our CEOGoogle in AfricaNext Billion UsersarticleOur $1 billion investment in Africa's digital transformationToday at Google for Africa, Google CEO Sundar Pichai announced a $1 billion investment into Africa over five years.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Google_for_Africa_Announcement_3.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-africa/google-for-africa/Sundar PichaiCEO of Google and AlphabetThese researchers are bringing AI to farmershttps://blog.google/technology/ai/researchers-make-sure-ai-works-for-farmers/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>“Farmers feed the entire world — so how might we support them to be resilient and build sustainable systems that also support global food security?” It’s a question that Diana Akrong found herself asking last year. Diana is a UX researcher based in Accra, Ghana, and the founding member of Google’s Accra UX team.</p><p>Across the world, her manager Dr. Courtney Heldreth, was equally interested in answering this question. Courtney is a social psychologist and a staff UX researcher based in Seattle, and both women work as part of Google’s <a href="https://pair.withgoogle.com/">People + Artificial Intelligence Research (PAIR) group</a>. “Looking back on history, we can see how the industrial revolution played a significant role in creating global inequality,” she says. “It set most of Western Europe onto a path of economic dominance that was then followed by both military and political dominance.” Courtney and Diana teamed up on an exploratory effort focused on how AI can help better the lives of small, local farming communities in the Global South. They and their team want to understand what farmers need, their practices, value systems, what their social lives are like — and make sure that Google products reflect these dynamics.</p><p>One result of their work is a <a href="https://interactions.acm.org/archive/view/july-august-2021/what-does-ai-mean-for-smallholder-farmers">recently published research paper</a>. The paper — written alongside their colleagues Dr. Jess Holbrook at Google and Dr. Norman Makoto Su of Indiana University and published in the ACM Interactions trade journal — dives into why we need farmer-centered AI research, and what it could mean not just for farmers, but for everyone they feed. I recently took some time to learn more about their work.</p><br/><p><b>How would you explain your job to someone who isn't in tech?</b></p><p><b>Courtney:</b> I would say I’m a researcher trying to understand underserved and historically marginalized users’ lives and needs so we can create products that work better for them. </p><p><b>Diana: </b>I’m a researcher who looks at how people interact with technology. My superpower is my curiosity and it’s my mission to understand and advocate for user needs, explore business opportunities and share knowledge.</p><br/><p><b>What’s something on your mind right now? </b></p><p><b>Diana:</b> Because of COVID-19, there’s the threat of a <a href="http://www.fao.org/2019-ncov/q-and-a/impact-on-food-and-agriculture/en/">major food crisis</a> in India and elsewhere. We’re wondering how we can work with small farms as well as local consumers, policymakers, agricultural workers, agribusiness owners and NGOs to solve this problem.</p><p>Agriculture is very close to my heart, personally. Prior to joining Google, I spent a lot of time learning from smallholder farmers across my country and helping design concepts to address their needs. </p></div></div><div class="block-pull_quote"><div class="uni-pull-quote h-c-page"><section class="h-c-grid"><div class="uni-pull-quote__wrapper h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-m--6 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-m--offset-3 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="uni-pull-quote__inner-wrapper h-c-copy h-c-copy"><q class="uni-pull-quote__text">“Farmers feed the entire world — so how might we support them to be resilient and build sustainable systems that also support global food security?”</q> <cite class="uni-pull-quote__author"><span class="uni-pull-quote__author-meta"><strong class="h-u-font-weight-medium">Diana Akrong</strong><br/> UX researcher, Google</span></cite></div></div></section></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><br/></p><p><b>Courtney:</b> I’ve been thinking about how AI can be seen as this magical, heroic thing, but there are also many risks to using it in places where there aren’t laws to protect people. When I think about Google’s <a href="https://ai.google/principles/">AI Principles</a> — be socially beneficial, be accountable to people, avoid reinforcing bias, prioritize safety — those things define what projects I want to work on. It’s also why my colleague Tabitha Yong and I developed a set of <a href="https://design.google/library/racial-equity-everyday-products/">best practices</a> for designing more equitable AI products.</p><br/><p><b>Can you tell me more about your paper, “What Does AI Mean for Smallholder Farmers? A Proposal for Farmer-Centered AI Research,” recently published in <a href="https://interactions.acm.org/archive/view/july-august-2021/what-does-ai-mean-for-smallholder-farmers">ACM Interactions</a>? </b></p><p><b>Courtney:</b> The impact and failures of AI are often very western and U.S.-centric. We’re trying to think about how to make this more fair and inclusive for communities with different needs around the globe. For example, in our farmer-centered AI research, we know that most existing AI solutions are designed for large farms in the developed world. However, many farmers in the Global South live and work in rural areas, which trail behind urban areas in terms of connectivity and digital adoption. By focusing on the daily realities of these farmers, we can better understand different perspectives, especially those of people who don’t live in the U.S. and Europe, so that Google’s products work for everyone, everywhere.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_carousel"><div class="h-c-page article-module" data-component="uni-image-carousel"><div class="article-module glue-pagination h-c-carousel h-c-carousel--simple h-c-carousel--dark ng-cloak" data-glue-pagination-config="{cyclical: true}"><div class="h-c-carousel__wrap"><ul class="glue-carousel ng-cloak" data-glue-carousel-options="{pointerTypes: ['touch', 'mouse'], jump: true}"><li class="h-c-carousel__item article-carousel__slide"><figure class="h-c-grid"><div aria-label="Courtney is on the left of a giant billboard at the CGIAR Platform for Big Data in Agriculture summit in 2019 and Diana is on the right side of the same sign." class="article-carousel__slide-img h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1" style="background-image: url(https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Courtney_and_Diana_CGIAR.max-1000x1000.jpg);"><span class="h-u-visually-hidden">Courtney is on the left of a giant billboard at the CGIAR Platform for Big Data in Agriculture summit in 2019 and Diana is on the right side of the same sign.</span></div><figcaption class="article-carousel__caption h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col-l--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2"><div class="rich-text"><p>In 2019, Courtney and Diana led a workshop at the CGIAR Platform for Big Data in Agriculture summit; Courtney also participated in a panel discussion. In 2020, Diana spoke at a <a href="https://bigdata.cgiar.org/blog-post/2020-convention-session-human-centered-design-and-gender/">virtual CGIAR panel</a> on human-centered design. </p></div></figcaption></figure></li><li class="h-c-carousel__item article-carousel__slide"><figure class="h-c-grid"><div aria-label="Diana on the left and Courtney on the right are smiling and hugging each other." class="article-carousel__slide-img h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1" style="background-image: url(https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/courtney__Diana.max-600x600.jpg);"><span class="h-u-visually-hidden">Diana on the left and Courtney on the right are smiling and hugging each other.</span></div><figcaption class="article-carousel__caption h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col-l--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2"><div class="rich-text"><p>Diana (left) and Courtney (right) are dedicated to building inclusive AI for farmers with small rural businesses in Africa and Asia. Diana is based in Accra, Ghana and Courtney is based in Seattle, Washington in the U.S. </p></div></figcaption></figure></li><li class="h-c-carousel__item article-carousel__slide"><figure class="h-c-grid"><div aria-label="Courtney is pictured on a research trip to India, looking out of a latticed window with a beautiful traditional Indian dress and earrings." class="article-carousel__slide-img h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1" style="background-image: url(https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Courtney_Hero4.max-1000x1000.jpg);"><span class="h-u-visually-hidden">Courtney is pictured on a research trip to India, looking out of a latticed window with a beautiful traditional Indian dress and earrings.</span></div><figcaption class="article-carousel__caption h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col-l--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2"><div class="rich-text"><p>Courtney pictured here during a research trip to India.</p></div></figcaption></figure></li><li class="h-c-carousel__item article-carousel__slide"><figure class="h-c-grid"><div aria-label="Diana is smiling and wearing an apron for a team building exercise." class="article-carousel__slide-img h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1" style="background-image: url(https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Diana2.max-1600x1600.jpg);"><span class="h-u-visually-hidden">Diana is smiling and wearing an apron for a team building exercise.</span></div><figcaption class="article-carousel__caption h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col-l--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2"><div class="rich-text"><p>Diana is all smiles at a team building event.</p></div></figcaption></figure></li></ul><div class="h-c-carousel__paginate glue-pagination-previous uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "interaction", "action": "image carousel", "label": "arrow - left click" }' data-glue-pagination-label="Previous" data-glue-pagination-update-model="false"><div class="h-c-carousel__paginate-wrap"><svg class="h-c-icon h-c-icon--keyboard-arrow-left" role="img"><use xlink:href="#mi-keyboard-arrow-right"></use></svg></div></div><div class="h-c-carousel__paginate glue-pagination-next uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "interaction", "action": "image carousel", "label": "arrow - right click" }' data-glue-pagination-label="Next" data-glue-pagination-update-model="false"><div class="h-c-carousel__paginate-wrap"><svg class="h-c-icon h-c-icon--keyboard-arrow-right" role="img"><use xlink:href="#mi-keyboard-arrow-right"></use></svg></div></div></div><div class="h-c-carousel__navigation"><div class="glue-pagination-page-list uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "interaction", "action": "image carousel", "label": "arrow - dot click" }'></div></div></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>Why did you want to work at Google?</b></p><p><b>Diana:</b> I see Google as home to teams with diverse experiences and skills who work collaboratively to tackle complex, important issues that change real people’s lives. I’ve thrived here because I get to work on projects I care about and play a critical role in growing the UX community here in Ghana.</p><p><b>Courtney:</b> I chose Google because we work on the world's hardest problems. Googlers are  fearless and the reach of Google’s products and services is unprecedented. As someone who comes from an underrepresented group, I never thought I would work here. To be here at this moment is so important to me, my community and my family. When I look at issues I care about the most — marginalized and underrepresented communities — the work we do plays a critical role in preventing algorithmic bias, bridging the digital divide and lessening these inequalities. </p><br/><p><b>How have you seen your research help real people? </b></p><p><b>Courtney: </b>In 2018, we worked with Titi Akinsanmi, Google’s Policy and Government Relations Lead for West and Francophone Africa, and PAIR Co-lead and Principal Research Scientist Fernanda Viegas on the report for <a href="https://research.google/pubs/pub48985/">AI in Nigeria</a>. Since then, the Ministry of Technology and Science reached out to Google to help form a strategy around AI. We’ve seen government bodies in sub-Saharan Africa use this paper as a roadmap to develop their own responsible AI policies.</p><br/><p><b>How should aspiring AI thinkers and future technologists prepare for a career in this field?</b></p><b>Diana:</b> My main advice? Start with people and their needs. A digital solution or AI may not be necessary to solve every problem. The <a href="https://pair.withgoogle.com/guidebook/">PAIR Guidebook</a> is a great reference for best practices and examples for designing with AI.</div></div><div class="block-perspective_qa"><div class="uni-related-article-tout h-c-page" data-component="uni-related-article-tout"><section class="h-c-grid"><a class="uni-related-article-tout__wrapper h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-m--6 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-m--offset-3 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "article lead", "action": "related article - inline", "label": "article: investing-in-indias-digital-future" }' href="https://blog.google/inside-google/company-announcements/investing-in-indias-digital-future/"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__inner-wrapper"><p class="uni-related-article-tout__eyebrow h-c-eyebrow">Read Article</p><div class="uni-related-article-tout__content-wrapper"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__image-wrapper"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__image" style="background-image: url('https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/G4_India_2020_-_Lotus_2.max-500x500.jpg')"></div></div><div class="uni-related-article-tout__content"><h4 class="uni-related-article-tout__header h-has-bottom-margin">Investing in India's digital future</h4><p class="uni-related-article-tout__body">Google CEO Sundar Pichai announces a $10 billion Google for India Digitization Fund to accelerate India’s digital economy.</p><div class="cta module-cta h-c-copy uni-related-article-tout__cta muted"><span class="nowrap">Read Article<svg class="icon h-c-icon" role="presentation"><use xlink:href="#mi-arrow-forward" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"></use></svg></span></div></div></div></div></a></section></div></div></body></html>Mon, 23 Aug 2021 15:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/technology/ai/researchers-make-sure-ai-works-for-farmers/Next Billion UsersAIarticleThese researchers are bringing AI to farmersTwo Googlers living on opposite sides of the world work together on AI to find ways to better the lives of rural farmers in Africa and Asia.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/hero_RbHfBqx.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/technology/ai/researchers-make-sure-ai-works-for-farmers/MJ PhamSenior Strategist, Responsible InnovationA new Android smartphone and 5G partnership with Jiohttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/new-android-smartphone-and-5g-partnership-jio/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><i>Editor’s note: Today, we <a href="https://india.googleblog.com/2021/06/partnering-with-jio-to-help-bring.html">announced the next steps</a> in our partnership with Jio Platforms, including a new, affordable Jio smartphone built with an optimized version of Android OS and a new 5G collaboration powered by Google Cloud. The following is adapted from remarks delivered by Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet, at Reliance Industries’ Annual General Meeting today.</i></p><br/><p>Thank you to everyone at Reliance Industries for all you do for India — from investing in infrastructure and technology to creating jobs and expanding opportunity to supporting communities in need, especially in this difficult moment for the country.</p><br/><p>It’s been devastating to see the country hit so hard by COVID-19. Yet it’s heartening to see how Reliance has stepped up to contribute to the national response and get support to the communities that need it most. On behalf of all of us at Google: We hope you are taking care and we are wishing for better days ahead.</p><br/><p>For Google, the past year has brought renewed purpose and greater urgency to our mission to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. At a time when so many aspects of our lives and work are moving online, it’s even more important to make technology accessible and helpful for everyone. </p><br/><p>This goal is at the heart of our partnership with Reliance Jio. I was proud to <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTdVmgtS7e0">help launch</a> this partnership last year. It was the first and biggest equity investment from the ₹75,000 crore ($10 billion) <a href="https://blog.google/inside-google/company-announcements/investing-in-indias-digital-future">Google for India Digitization Fund</a>.</p><br/><p>Our vision was to bring affordable access to information for Indians in their own language, to build new products and services for India’s unique needs, and to empower businesses with technology.</p><br/><p>I’m excited that today, we can announce the next steps in this vision, starting with a new, affordable Jio smartphone, created with Google. Our teams have optimized a version of our Android OS especially for this device. It will offer language and translation features, a great camera, and support for the latest Android updates.</p><br/><p>It is built for India and it will open up new possibilities for millions of new users who will experience the internet for the very first time. And we can’t wait to show you the device later this year.</p><br/><p>I’m also proud to announce that we are taking our collaboration further with a new 5G partnership between Google Cloud and Jio.</p><br/><p>It will help more than a billion Indians connect to a faster and better internet, support businesses in their digital transformation, and help Jio build new services in sectors like health, education and more — laying a foundation for the next phase of India’s digitization.  </p><p>As part of this collaboration, Reliance will also shift its core retail businesses to Google Cloud’s infrastructure. They will be able take advantage of Google’s AI and machine learning, e-commerce, and demand forecasting offerings. Harnessing the reliability and performance of Google Cloud will enable these businesses to scale up as needed to respond to customer demand. </p><p>Empowering businesses as they embark on their digital transformation is a key part of our mission in India, and I’m excited for the innovations this partnership will help unleash. We are proud to play a part in India’s next wave of technological innovation. </p><br/><p>Helping to connect 1.3 billion Indians to the opportunities the internet creates is meaningful to all of us at Google — and certainly to me personally. I know that with greater access to smartphones and improved connectivity, there’s no limit to what India’s people can do. </p><br/><p>We look forward to getting technology into the hands of more people and to exploring what more we can achieve together in the years ahead. </p></div></div><div class="block-perspective_qa"><div class="uni-related-article-tout h-c-page" data-component="uni-related-article-tout"><section class="h-c-grid"><a class="uni-related-article-tout__wrapper h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-m--6 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-m--offset-3 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "article lead", "action": "related article - inline", "label": "article: bringing-internet-access-millions-more-indians-jio" }' href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/bringing-internet-access-millions-more-indians-jio/"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__inner-wrapper"><p class="uni-related-article-tout__eyebrow h-c-eyebrow">Read Article</p><div class="uni-related-article-tout__content-wrapper"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__image-wrapper"><div class="uni-related-article-tout__image" style="background-image: url('https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Screen_Shot_2015-08-26_at_6.04.21_PM.max-500x500.png')"></div></div><div class="uni-related-article-tout__content"><h4 class="uni-related-article-tout__header h-has-bottom-margin">Bringing internet access to millions more Indians with Jio</h4><p class="uni-related-article-tout__body">We signed an agreement to invest $4.5 billion in Jio Platforms Ltd—the first investment from the Google For India Digitization Fund.</p><div class="cta module-cta h-c-copy uni-related-article-tout__cta muted"><span class="nowrap">Read Article<svg class="icon h-c-icon" role="presentation"><use xlink:href="#mi-arrow-forward" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"></use></svg></span></div></div></div></div></a></section></div></div></body></html>Thu, 24 Jun 2021 08:30:00 +0000https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/new-android-smartphone-and-5g-partnership-jio/A message from our CEOAndroidGoogle CloudNext Billion UsersarticleA new Android smartphone and 5G partnership with JioWe’re announcing the next steps of our Jio Platforms partnership: a new, affordable Android smartphone & 5G collaboration with Google Cloud.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/New-02.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/new-android-smartphone-and-5g-partnership-jio/Sundar PichaiCEO of Google and AlphabetHow to help people navigate the internet, voice-firsthttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/voice-users-playbook/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>When it comes to navigating the internet, many of us still think of keyboards and touchscreens as the norm. Or at least we did until recently. </p><br/><p>Advances in technology — and the changing preferences of internet users around the world — mean that more and more people are now using their voice to access online information and tools. According to Statista, <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/1036727/global-voice-search-region-device/">42% of the global population — and 50% of people in Asia-Pacific</a> — have conducted a voice search on a device recently. And the trend is growing especially quickly in <a href="https://www.thinkwithgoogle.com/intl/en-apac/country/india/ok-google-how-is-voice-making-technology-more-accessible-in-india/">places with large numbers of new internet users</a>, where many people have no history of using a computer or even typing into a smartphone.</p><br/><p>Today, we’re releasing a <a href="http://nextbillionusers.google/tools/voice-playbook.pdf">Voice Playbook</a> to help the technology industry better understand why people are using their voice, the challenges that remain to realizing its potential and how we can build more relevant and inclusive technology in response. </p><br/><h3>New internet users are finding their voice</h3><br/><p>It’s easy to think of the ability to talk to your phone as just a matter of convenience — a way of getting information while you’re driving or cooking. But for many new internet users, voice isn’t just helpful — it’s critical. It provides a means for people coming online with low literacy levels to become self-sufficient, without help from others. It simplifies the way they interact with their device, given the complexity of typing in scripted languages. And it makes the output they’re seeking — the result of a search query, for example — much easier to understand. </p><br/><p>Right now, people are using their voice to record and share themselves speaking, issue commands like search queries, use virtual assistants and dictate phrases to be transcribed. </p><p><br/></p></div></div><div class="block-image_carousel"><div class="h-c-page article-module" data-component="uni-image-carousel"><div class="article-module glue-pagination h-c-carousel h-c-carousel--simple h-c-carousel--dark ng-cloak" data-glue-pagination-config="{cyclical: true}"><div class="h-c-carousel__wrap"><ul class="glue-carousel ng-cloak" data-glue-carousel-options="{pointerTypes: ['touch', 'mouse'], jump: true}"><li class="h-c-carousel__item article-carousel__slide"><figure class="h-c-grid"><div aria-label="Graphic showing how people are using their voice to issue commands to their device" class="article-carousel__slide-img h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1" style="background-image: url(https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Commands.max-2000x2000.jpg);"><span class="h-u-visually-hidden">Graphic showing how people are using their voice to issue commands to their device</span></div></figure></li><li class="h-c-carousel__item article-carousel__slide"><figure class="h-c-grid"><div aria-label="Graphic showing how people are using their voice to make recordings on their device" class="article-carousel__slide-img h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1" style="background-image: url(https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Recording.max-2000x2000.jpg);"><span class="h-u-visually-hidden">Graphic showing how people are using their voice to make recordings on their device</span></div></figure></li><li class="h-c-carousel__item article-carousel__slide"><figure class="h-c-grid"><div aria-label="Graphic showing how people are using their voice to conversationally interact with their device" class="article-carousel__slide-img h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1" style="background-image: url(https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Conversational.max-2000x2000.jpg);"><span class="h-u-visually-hidden">Graphic showing how people are using their voice to conversationally interact with their device</span></div></figure></li><li class="h-c-carousel__item article-carousel__slide"><figure class="h-c-grid"><div aria-label="Graphic showing how people are using their voice to dictate phrases to their device for transcription" class="article-carousel__slide-img h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1" style="background-image: url(https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Dictation.max-2000x2000.jpg);"><span class="h-u-visually-hidden">Graphic showing how people are using their voice to dictate phrases to their device for transcription</span></div></figure></li></ul><div class="h-c-carousel__paginate glue-pagination-previous uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "interaction", "action": "image carousel", "label": "arrow - left click" }' data-glue-pagination-label="Previous" data-glue-pagination-update-model="false"><div class="h-c-carousel__paginate-wrap"><svg class="h-c-icon h-c-icon--keyboard-arrow-left" role="img"><use xlink:href="#mi-keyboard-arrow-right"></use></svg></div></div><div class="h-c-carousel__paginate glue-pagination-next uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "interaction", "action": "image carousel", "label": "arrow - right click" }' data-glue-pagination-label="Next" data-glue-pagination-update-model="false"><div class="h-c-carousel__paginate-wrap"><svg class="h-c-icon h-c-icon--keyboard-arrow-right" role="img"><use xlink:href="#mi-keyboard-arrow-right"></use></svg></div></div></div><div class="h-c-carousel__navigation"><div class="glue-pagination-page-list uni-click-tracker" data-analytics='{ "event": "page interaction", "category": "interaction", "action": "image carousel", "label": "arrow - dot click" }'></div></div></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>People are using voice because it makes the internet less complex and confusing. At the same time, there are still significant, often frustrating challenges that remain. One is misinterpretation. Voice recognition and speech interpretation technology isn’t perfect yet, so people everywhere experience misinterpretations. But when new users have a bad experience with voice, they tend to blame themselves. A comment we hear a lot is that “it couldn’t understand my accent.” After a few bad experiences, people often just give up. </p><br/><p>A second major challenge is self-perception. New internet users can feel like using their voice makes others think they’re uneducated, or they worry that their friends will make fun of them. </p><br/><p>On top of this, there are privacy concerns. When people are often surrounded by big groups of people, they’re reluctant to speak to their device because they’re afraid of being overheard. </p><br/><h3>A playbook for voice technology</h3><br/><p>Technology can pose challenges for voice users, but if it’s designed and built right, it can also help overcome them.  </p><br/><p>Drawing on the lessons we’ve learned with our own voice technology, we’ve created a set of principles to guide the industry forward and help technology-makers everywhere think about how to build for voice. When we understand people’s experience of voice, and build around that experience, we can dramatically improve the helpfulness and accessibility of the technology they use.</p><p></p><ul><li>We can make voice more discoverable with simple icons (not ‘50s-style microphones) that meet common industry standards, take up greater space on the screen and require no more than one tap to access. </li><li>We can prevent people from becoming frustrated and giving up by making the output they get simpler and easier to digest. (For example, we can break up long passages into simple, shorter sentences when text is being read out.)  </li><li>We can reflect new voice users’ daily realities by better supporting the way they speak naturally — whether it’s factoring in pauses for breathing and thinking, or providing greater support for the many multilingual people who switch from one language to another when they’re talking.</li></ul></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="A graphic showing Google's seven principles for building better technology to support voice users" class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/7Principles.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>As hundreds of millions more people around the world come online, we want voice to feel more natural and useful. We’re looking forward to helping more people use their voice — and feel heard.</p></div></div></body></html>Wed, 02 Jun 2021 02:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/voice-users-playbook/ResearchNext Billion UsersarticleHow to help people navigate the internet, voice-firstA new Google playbook shows how people are using their voice to navigate the internet—and how technology companies can better support themhttps://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/BR_202010_ALE_04_X0006.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/voice-users-playbook/Asif BakiDirector, User ExperienceNext Billion UsersJung KimPrincipal Designer, Next Billion UsersWhat drives Nithya Sambasivan’s fight for fairnesshttps://blog.google/technology/research/what-drives-nithya-sambasivans-fight-for-fairness/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>When Nithya Sambasivan was finishing her undergraduate degree in engineering, she felt slightly unsatisfied. “I wanted to know, ‘how will the technology I build impact people?’” she says. Luckily, she would soon discover the field of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and pursue her graduate degrees. <br/></p><p>She completed her master’s and PhD in HCI focusing on technology design for low-income communities in India. “I worked with sex workers, slum communities, microentrepreneurs, fruit and vegetables sellers on the streetside...” she says. “I wanted to understand what their values, aspirations and struggles are, and how we can build with them in mind.” </p><p>Today, Nithya is the founder of the HCI group at the Google Research India lab and an HCI researcher at <a href="https://pair.withgoogle.com/">PAIR</a>, a multidisciplinary team at Google that explores the human side of AI by doing fundamental research, building tools, creating design frameworks, and working with diverse communities. She recently sat down to answer some of our questions about her journey to researching responsible AI, fairness and championing historically underrepresented technology users.</p><p><b>How would you explain your job to someone who isn't in tech?</b></p><p>I’m a human-computer interaction (HCI) researcher, which means I study people to better understand how to build technology that works for them. There’s been a lot of focus in the research community on building AI systems and the possibility of positively impacting the lives of billions of people. I focus on human-centered, responsible AI; specifically looking for ways it can empower communities in the Global South, where over 80% of the world’s population lives. Today, my research outlines a road map for fairness research in India, calling for re-contextualizing datasets and models while empowering communities and enabling an entire fairness ecosystem.</p><p><b>What originally inspired your interest in technology? </b></p><p>I grew up in a middle class family, the younger of two daughters from the South of India. My parents have very progressive views about gender roles and independence, especially in a conservative society — this definitely influenced what and how I research; things like gender, caste and  poverty. In school, I started off studying engineering, which is a conventional path in India. Then, I went on to focus on HCI and designing with my own and other under-represented communities around the world.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="Nithya smiling at a small child while working in the field." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/2017-04-059.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>How do Google’s  <a href="https://ai.google/principles/">AI Principles</a> inform your research? And how do you approach your research in general?</b></p><p>Context matters. A general theory of algorithmic fairness cannot be based on “Western” populations alone. My general approach is to research an important long-term, foundational problem. For example, our research on <a href="https://arxiv.org/pdf/2101.09995.pdf">algorithmic fairness</a> reframes the conversation on ethical AI away from focusing mainly on Western, meaning largely European or North American, perspectives. Another <a href="https://storage.googleapis.com/pub-tools-public-publication-data/pdf/0d556e45afc54afeb2eb6b51a9bc1827b9961ff4.pdf">project</a> revealed that AI developers have historically focused more on the model — or algorithm — instead of the data. Both deeply affect the eventual AI performance, so being so focused on only one aspect creates downstream problems. For example, data sets may fully miss sub-populations, so when they are deployed, they may  have much higher error rates or be unusable. Or they could make outcomes worse for certain groups, by misidentifying them as suspects for crimes or erroneously denying them bank loans they should receive.  </p><p>These insights not only enable AI systems to be better designed for under-represented communities; they also generate new considerations in the field of computing for humane and inclusive data collection, gender and social status representation, and privacy and safety needs of the most vulnerable. They are then  incorporated into Google products that millions of people use, such as <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/making-privacy-personal-files-google/">Safe Folder</a> on Files Go, <a href="https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/gadgets-news/google-brings-incognito-mode-to-google-go-app-heres-what-it-means-for-you/articleshow/71743648.cms">Google Go</a>’s incognito mode, <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2018/05/30/google-launches-neighbourly/">Neighbourly</a>‘s privacy, <a href="https://india.googleblog.com/2019/06/get-alerts-with-google-maps-if-your.html">Safe Safer</a> by Google Maps and <a href="https://india.googleblog.com/2018/10/towards-gender-equity-in-stem-through.html">Women in STEM</a> videos. </p><p><b>What are some of the questions you’re seeking to answer with your work?</b></p><p>How do we challenge inherent “West”-centric assumptions for algorithmic fairness, tech norms and make AI work better for people around the world?</p><p>For example, there’s an assumption that algorithmic biases can be fixed by adding more data from different groups. But in India, we've found that data can't always represent individuals or events for many different reasons like economics and access to devices. The data could come mostly from middle class Indian men, since they’re more likely to have internet access. This means algorithms will work well for them. Yet, over half the population — primarily women, rural and tribal communities — lack access to the internet and they’re left out. Caste, religion and other factors can also contribute to new biases for AI models. </p><p><b>How should aspiring AI thinkers and future technologists prepare for a career in this field? </b></p><p>It’s really important that Brown and Black people enter this field. We not only bring technical skills but also lived experiences and values that are so critical to the field of computing. Our communities are the most vulnerable to AI interventions, so it’s important we shape and build these systems. To members of this community: Never play small or let someone make you feel small. Involve yourself in the political, social and ecological aspects of the invisible, not on tech innovation alone. We can’t afford not to.</p></div></div></body></html>Mon, 22 Mar 2021 15:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/technology/research/what-drives-nithya-sambasivans-fight-for-fairness/The She WordResearchNext Billion UsersAIarticleWhat drives Nithya Sambasivan’s fight for fairnessMeet Nithya, one of the founders of the HCI group at the Google Research India lab and an HCI researcher at PAIR.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/hero_rgk6ZzT.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/technology/research/what-drives-nithya-sambasivans-fight-for-fairness/MJ PhamSenior Strategist, Responsible InnovationMeet the researcher creating more access with languagehttps://blog.google/inside-google/googlers/shachi-dave-natural-language-processing/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>When you’ve got your hands full, so you use your voice to ask your phone to play your favorite song, it can feel like magic. In reality, it’s a more complicated combination of engineering, design and natural language processing at work, making it easier for many of us to use our smartphones. But what happens when this voice technology isn’t available in our own language? </p><p>This is something Google India researcher Shachi Dave considers as part of her day-to-day work. While <a href="https://www.ethnologue.com/guides/ethnologue200">English is the most widely spoken language globally</a>, it ranks third as the most widely spoken native language (behind Mandarin and Spanish)—just ahead of Hindi, Bengali and a number of other languages that are official in India. Home to more than one billion people and an impressive number of official languages—22, to be exact—India is at the cutting edge of Google’s language localization or <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IdBVXnWbYKc">L10n</a> (10 represents the number of letters between ‘l’ and ‘n’) efforts. </p><p>Shachi, who is a founding member of the Google India Research team, works on natural language understanding, a field of artificial intelligence (AI) which builds computer algorithms to understand our everyday speech and language. Working with Google’s AI principles, she aims to ensure teams build our products to be socially beneficial and inclusive. Born and raised in India, Shachi graduated with a master’s degree in computer science from the University of Southern California. After working at a few U.S. startups, she joined Google over 12 years ago and returned to India to take on more research and leadership responsibilities. Since she joined the company, she has worked closely with teams in Mountain View, New York, Zurich and Tel Aviv. She also actively contributes towards improving diversity and inclusion at Google through mentoring fellow female software engineers.</p></div></div><div class="block-video"><div class="h-c-page h-c-page--mobile-full-bleed"><div class="h-c-grid"><div class="h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col-l--10 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-1"><div class="article-module uni-article-video uni-article-video--body" data-component="uni-article-yt-player" data-page-title="" data-video-id="IdBVXnWbYKc"><div class="uni-article-video__embed-container hidden"><div id="uni-article-yt-player-IdBVXnWbYKc"></div></div><figure><a class="h-c-video h-c-video--marquee uni-article-video__custom-wrapper" role="link" tabindex="0"><div class="uni-article-video__aspect-image"><img alt="A video showcasing a localization event in India." src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/Shachi_Dave_-_Video_embed_keyframe_referen.max-1000x1000_FIEfMsL.png"/><div class="uni-article-video__dimmer"></div><svg class="uni-article-video__play-button--active" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_play_button_no_hole"></use></svg><svg class="uni-article-video__play-button" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_play_button"></use></svg><div class="uni-article-video__duration loading"><svg class="uni-article-video__duration-icon" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_duration"></use></svg><span class="uni-article-video__duration-time">10:25</span></div></div></a></figure></div></div></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>How would you explain your job to someone who isn't in tech?</b></p><p>My job is to make sure computers can understand and interact with humans naturally, a field of computer science we call natural language processing (NLP). Our research has found that many Indian users tend to use a mix of English and their native language when interacting with our technology, so that’s why understanding natural language is so important—it’s key to <a href="https://india.googleblog.com/2020/12/l10n-localisation-breaking-down.html">localization</a>, our efforts to provide our services in every language and culture—while making sure our technology is fun to use and natural-sounding along the way.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>What are some of the biggest challenges you’re tackling in your work now?</b></p><br/><p>The biggest challenge is that India is a multilingual country, with 22 official languages. I have seen friends, family and even strangers struggle with technology that doesn’t work for them in their language, even though it can work so well in other languages. </p><p>Let’s say one of our users is a shop owner and lives in a small village in the southern Indian state of Telangana. She goes online for the first time with her phone. But since she has never used a computer or smartphone before, using her voice is the most natural way for her to interact with her phone. While she knows some English, she is also more comfortable speaking in her native language, Telugu. Our job is to make sure that she has a positive experience and does not have to struggle to get the information she needs. Perhaps she’s able to order more goods for her shop through the web, or maybe she decides to have her services listed online to grow her business. </p><p>So that’s part of my motivation to do my research, and that’s one of Google’s <a href="https://ai.google/principles/">AI Principles</a>, too—to make sure our technology is socially beneficial. </p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>Speaking of the <a href="https://ai.google/principles/">AI Principles</a>, what other principles help inform your research?</b></p><p>Another one of <a href="https://ai.google/principles/">Google’s AI Principles</a> is avoiding creating or reinforcing unfair bias. AI systems are good at recognizing patterns within data. Given that most data that we feed into training an AI system is generated by humans, it tends to have human biases and prejudices. I look for systematic ways to remove these biases. This requires constant awareness: being aware of how people have different languages, backgrounds and financial statuses. Our society has people from the entire financial spectrum, from super rich to low-income, so what works on the most expensive phones might not work on lower-cost devices. Also, some of our users might not be able to read or write, so we need to provide some audio and visual tools for them to have a better internet experience.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>What led you to this career and inspired you to join Google?  </b></p><p>I took an Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course as an undergraduate, and it piqued my interest and curiosity. That ultimately led to research on machine translation at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay and then an advanced degree at the University of Southern California. After that, I spent some time working at U.S. startups that were using NLP and machine learning. </p><p>But I wanted more. I wanted to be intellectually challenged, solving hard problems. Since Google had the computing power and reputation for solving problems at scale, it became one of my top choices for places to work. </p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>Now you’ve been at Google for over 12 years. What are some of the most rewarding moments of your career?</b></p><p>Definitely when I saw the quality improvements I worked on go live on Google Search and Assistant, positively impacting millions of people. I remember I was able to help launch local features like getting the Assistant to play the songs people wanted to hear. Playing music upon request makes people happy, and it’s a feature that still works today. </p><p>Over the years, I have gone through difficult situations as someone from an underrepresented group. I was fortunate to have a great support network—women peers as well as allies—who helped me. I try to pay it forward by being a mentor for underrepresented groups both within and outside Google.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>How should aspiring AI researchers prepare for a career in this field? </b></p><p>First, be a lifelong learner: The industry is moving at a fast pace. It’s important to carve out time to keep yourself well-read about the latest research in your field as well as related fields.</p><p>Second, know your motivation: When a problem is super challenging and super hard, you need to have that focus and belief that what you’re doing is going to contribute positively to our society.</p></div></div></body></html>Mon, 11 Jan 2021 18:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/inside-google/googlers/shachi-dave-natural-language-processing/The She WordResearchNext Billion UsersAIarticleMeet the researcher creating more access with languageGoogle India researcher Shachi Dave uses natural language understanding to build for our Next Billion Users across India.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/shachi-hero-image.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/inside-google/googlers/shachi-dave-natural-language-processing/MJ PhamSenior Strategist, Responsible InnovationA more inclusive global digital economyhttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/more-inclusive-global-digital-economy/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><i>Editor’s Note: The following is adapted from <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Py8q5KILhg">remarks</a> delivered by Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google and Alphabet, at the Singapore FinTech Festival today on the need and opportunity to build a more inclusive global digital economy.</i></p><br/><p>Thank you to the Monetary Authority of Singapore for the invitation to speak today—and for hosting this important event. While I hope we can have these big conversations in person again soon, I am grateful for all the ways that technology has kept us connected during the pandemic.</p><br/><p>We’ve seen this year how online has been a lifeline. In Southeast Asia, 8 out of 10 people said that technology helped them navigate the pandemic, whether it was families searching for the latest COVID-19 information, small businesses using digital tools to reach new customers or students continuing to learn remotely.</p><br/><p>Being helpful in these moments is at the core of Google’s mission to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful. We’re proud that users turned to products like Search, YouTube, and Maps to help people get through uncertainty, and that tools like Meet and Google Classroom helped keep people connected and businesses productive in these times. </p><br/><p><b>Southeast Asia’s digital transformation</b></p><br/><p>COVID-19 has accelerated the adoption of digital tools and trends by years. As a result, the Southeast Asian internet economy is on the verge of a massive transformation. A <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/e-conomy-sea-2020/?_ga=2.119659599.693957978.1607304071-743595687.1547080313">recent report</a> we did with Temasek and Bain &amp; Company shows that more than 40 million people in the region connected to the internet for the first time in 2020—that’s four times as many as the year before. In addition, one in three digital service consumers were new to a service, like virtual learning or buying groceries online. And 90 percent intend to continue using that service post-pandemic.<br/></p><br/><p>These digital trends aren’t just happening in cities. In places like Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines, more than half of first-time users were from outside metropolitan areas, which shows huge promise for closing the urban-rural digital divide.</p><br/><p>While COVID has accelerated the use of digital tools, it’s also exposed how many people  are still left behind: from the 1.7 billion people around the world who are still unbanked, to the huge portion of African households without access to broadband, to millions of women entrepreneurs who lack the same access to opportunity as their male counterparts.</p><br/><p><b>A more inclusive global digital economy</b></p><br/><p>So the question is: how can we use this moment to reimagine a more inclusive digital economy? One that brings the benefits of the internet to everyone?</p><br/><p>The answer is two-fold: First, by accelerating progress in closing the digital divide, which means expanding connectivity, financial inclusion, and digital skills. Second, by deepening partnerships between governments and business, which means  building on the new collaborations we’ve seen during COVID. </p></div></div><div class="block-video"><div class="h-c-page h-c-page--mobile-full-bleed"><div class="h-c-grid"><div class="h-c-grid__col h-c-grid__col-l--10 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-1"><div class="article-module uni-article-video uni-article-video--body" data-component="uni-article-yt-player" data-page-title="" data-video-id="5Py8q5KILhg"><div class="uni-article-video__embed-container hidden"><div id="uni-article-yt-player-5Py8q5KILhg"></div></div><figure><a class="h-c-video h-c-video--marquee uni-article-video__custom-wrapper" role="link" tabindex="0"><div class="uni-article-video__aspect-image"><img alt="Sundar Pichai at the Singapore Fintech Festival" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/7VDAo3dAdi5EqrR.max-1000x1000.png"/><div class="uni-article-video__dimmer"></div><svg class="uni-article-video__play-button--active" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_play_button_no_hole"></use></svg><svg class="uni-article-video__play-button" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_play_button"></use></svg><div class="uni-article-video__duration loading"><svg class="uni-article-video__duration-icon" role="img"><use xlink:href="#yt_video_duration"></use></svg><span class="uni-article-video__duration-time">10:25</span></div></div></a></figure></div></div></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>Connectivity as the foundation</b></p><br/><p>The question of inclusion and opportunity is deeply personal to me. Growing up in India, I didn’t have much access to a computer, or a phone. To make a call, I had to wait in long lines to use a shared phone with everyone else. So when our family finally got our first rotary phone, it changed our lives for the better, and it set me on a course to help bring technology to more people around the world. </p><br/><p>Today, an internet connection is the single best way to make technology available to more people. At Google, we are focused on the infrastructure—like the <a href="https://cloud.google.com/blog/products/infrastructure/introducing-equiano-a-subsea-cable-from-portugal-to-south-africa">subsea cables we’re building</a> between Western Europe and the West Coast of Africa, as well as the affordable, low-cost devices that can transform digital access—something our <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/bringing-internet-access-millions-more-indians-jio/">Android teams are working on with Jio Platforms</a> in India.</p><b><br/></b><p><b>Increasing financial inclusion with Google Pay</b></p><br/><p>Of course, it’s not just about connecting to the internet that’s important, it’s about what people can do with that connectivity. One of the most exciting advancements is financial connectivity, which ensures that everyone can participate in the economic system.</p><br/><p>That idea is what inspired us to launch Google Tez, now Google Pay, <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/introducing-tez/">our first digital payment platform</a>, in India in 2017. At the time, my home country was still largely a cash-based society. Since then, digital payments services have helped reshape how transactions are made. They’ve increased financial inclusion by making payments simple and seamless for over a hundred million Indians.</p><br/><p>This historic shift has changed what’s possible for business owners like Vijay Babu, who runs a laundry shop in Bangalore. Two years ago, Vijay would have had to pay $100 for a credit card terminal, worry about printed receipts, and wait days to get paid. </p><br/><p>Today, with Google Pay, and a little help from his daughter, Vijay is able to keep better track of his transactions, accept payments remotely, and build relationships with his customers.</p><br/><p>There are many others like Vijay. People are using Google Pay to do everything from send money home to their families and split the check for dinner. Kirana store owners are using it to pay their business expenses, as well as receive payments from their loyal customers.</p><br/><p>All told, people in India complete more than three billion digital transactions a month, two thirds of which are taking place outside India’s biggest cities. Digital payment transactions across Southeast Asia are set to almost double to $1.2 trillion by 2025.</p><br/><p>Now, we’re using the same technology to <a href="https://blog.google/products/google-pay/reimagined-pay-save-manage-expenses-and-more/">improve Google Pay globally,</a> starting in Singapore and the U.S., with more to come. And we’re partnering with organizations like the Gates Foundation, Omidyar Network, the Rockefeller Foundation and others to drive Mojaloop, a nonprofit creating open-source tools any country and organization can use to develop its own digital payments system.</p><br/><p><b>Bringing digital skills and tools to more people</b></p><br/><p>Connectivity is the foundation of a more inclusive digital economy. The next layer is ensuring that everyone, including small businesses, have access to digital skills and tools. One example is <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/a-grant-to-help-southeast-asia/">the work that the Asia Foundation is doing</a>, with support from our philanthropic arm Google.org, to train 200,000 small business owners and workers across Southeast Asia. </p><br/><p>This program means local nonprofits can help people like Lakela, an avocado farmer from Thailand who used YouTube to learn how to grow other types of fruit, and create new revenue streams for her business.</p><br/><p>We’re also investing in the innovation ecosystem, including entrepreneurs and start-ups, to ensure digital economies are sustainable.</p><br/><p><b>Power of partnerships</b></p><br/><p>We can’t do any of this alone. That’s why partnerships are the second part of our agenda.</p><br/><p>We have good models to build from. One of the bright spots in this year has been the strong partnerships forged between companies, governments, and NGOs, working together toward shared goals. Building a more inclusive digital economy will require this same spirit of collaboration.</p><br/><p>A place to start is digital trade. In Southeast Asia alone, it’s estimated that expanding business and trade through technology could add $1 trillion to overall regional GDP by 2025. And it will help entrepreneurs grow across borders, leading to more jobs, better services and new opportunities.</p><br/><p>Unlocking those benefits requires the right frameworks. Singapore and the Asia Pacific region are pioneering new approaches. New digital economy agreements could provide a template for other parts of the world, alongside broader trade deals like the new Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership.  By maximizing these digital agreements—and creating new ones—we can pave the way for a stronger, more inclusive digital economy. </p><br/><p>From closing digital divides to forging new partnerships, our goal for the post-COVID world is to ensure the benefits of technology can be shared as widely and equitably as possible.  </p><br/><p>If we can do that, 2020 will be remembered not as the end of the world we knew, but the beginning of a world that works better, for everyone. We look forward to building that world alongside all of you.</p></div></div></body></html>Mon, 07 Dec 2020 07:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/more-inclusive-global-digital-economy/Next Billion UsersGoogle in AsiaGoogle PayarticleA more inclusive global digital economySundar Pichai delivers remarks at the Singapore Fintech Festival on the need and opportunity to build a more inclusive global digital economy.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/DSC02551.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/more-inclusive-global-digital-economy/Sundar PichaiCEO of Google and AlphabetRise and move forward together: Indonesia’s digital futurehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/indonesias-digital-future/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>In a year like no other, Indonesian entrepreneurs have shown grit and determination to keep their businesses running for the communities that rely on them. They’ve also shown great creativity in adapting new tools and technologies—like Ida, the owner of a traditional cake business in Lombok who saw business dry up when local schools were forced to close. After taking a <a href="https://womenwill.google/">Women Will</a> course, Ida used Google My Business to connect with her customers, promote her range of cakes throughout Indonesia, and ultimately increase her income by 60 percent. Now she’s working with other women entrepreneurs in her community to help them make the most of technology in their own businesses.  </p><br/><p>At today’s virtual <a href="https://nextbillionusers.withgoogle.com/events/google-for-indonesia-en">Google for Indonesia</a>, we celebrated this entrepreneurial spirit in adversity— and shared new initiatives to help the businesses and workers most in need. We also deepened our commitment to building a strong, inclusive digital economy for all Indonesians, reflecting the theme of this year’s event: bangkit dan maju sama-sama (rise and move forward together).  </p><b><br/></b><p><b>Helping businesses and workers most in need</b></p><br/><p>For many Indonesian business owners, the first priority continues to be funding their operations through the downturn, so they can rebuild. Together with <a href="https://www.kiva.org/">Kiva</a> and local financial service providers, we’ve created a $10 million fund to extend low-interest loans to the small businesses hit hardest by COVID-19—in particular, those from underserved communities.  </p><br/><p>To support the fight against youth unemployment, <a href="http://google.org">Google.org</a> will make a $1 million grant to <a href="https://plan-international.or.id/">Yayasan Plan International Indonesia (Plan Indonesia)</a>, helping launch a program that will provide training and job matching assistance for over 5,000 young people.</p><br/><p>And as workers of all ages look to find work and improve their skills, we’ll continue to expand our <a href="https://kormo.google.com/index_id.html">Kormo Jobs</a> app with roles in sectors like logistics and essential services, and add new tools to meet job-seekers’ needs. The app already provides remote work listings and the option to interview remotely. From here, we’re adding AI-enabled learning to help job-seekers practise English, and partnering with <a href="https://arkademi.com/">ARKADEMI</a> &amp;<a href="https://www.qubisa.com/">QuBisa</a> to offer additional certified courses, including foundational IT training and advice on mastering recruitment processes. </p><br/><p><b>Preparing for a strong digital future</b></p><br/><p>Technology has helped Indonesia weather COVID-19, and it will have an even bigger role in our future beyond the pandemic. The <a href="https://economysea.withgoogle.com/">eConomy SEA 2020 report,</a> released last week, shows<a href="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-economy-sea.appspot.com/assets/pdf/Indonesia-e-Conomy_SEA_2020_Country_Insights.pdf">Indonesians adopting new digital services</a> faster than ever, while <a href="https://alphabeta.com/our-research/skills-for-the-future-capturing-a-rp-4434-trillion-opportunity-for-indonesia-in-2030-insights-from-forthcoming-research/">research from AlphaBeta</a> finds that a digitally-skilled workforce could add more than $300 billion to Indonesia’s GDP by 2030.  </p><br/><p>Realizing that potential means equipping more Indonesians with digital knowledge and confidence, and we’re committed to playing our part. This year, we’ve expanded and adapted our training initiatives across different areas of technology—hand in hand with the Indonesian government and our partners in business and the nonprofit sector.</p><p>Since the beginning of the year, more than 200,000 Indonesian small businesses have completed online <a href="https://grow.google/intl/ALL_sg/?utm_source=redirect&amp;utm_medium=redirect&amp;utm_term=gwg&amp;utm_content=apac&amp;utm_campaign=redirect">Grow with Google</a> skills courses, taking the total number to 1.7 million since 2015. Google Cloud has held 150,000 training labs to help Indonesians get cloud-related skills, complementing the opening of the <a href="https://cloud.google.com/blog/products/infrastructure/new-google-cloud-region-in-jakarta-now-open">Jakarta cloud region</a> earlier this year. And YouTube’s <a href="http://akademiedukreator.com/">Akademi Edukreator</a> partnership with <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu0yQD7NFMyLu_-TmKa4Hqg">Kok Bisa</a> has trained more than 1,000 teachers, young professionals, students and content creators to produce educational video content — with more in-depth training planned as we keep building the “educreator” community. </p><p>Today, we also announced an expansion of <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/digital-skills-for-indonesia/">Bangkit</a>: a collaboration between the Indonesian government, Google and Indonesia’s biggest technology companies, created to encourage the next generation of technology talent. </p><br/><p>Already, we’re seeing graduates from the first Bangkit cohort—many of them young women—go on to jobs throughout the private sector, pursuing big ambitions for careers at the forefront of technology. Next year, up to 3,000 Bangkit students will have the chance to pursue courses across six different tracks, from machine learning and Android development to the fundamentals of cloud. </p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="Bangkit graduate Irfani" class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/unnamed_5_8jTGsAK.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p>Irfani Sakinah, a 23-year old graduate from Makkassar, secured a job as a data scientist in Jakarta after completing the Bangkit program. </p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>With the energy and ideas of the next generation, and the solidarity we saw shine through at Google for Indonesia, I have no doubt that Indonesians will rise above the challenges of 2020, and move forward to a stronger future together.</p></div></div></body></html>Wed, 18 Nov 2020 04:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/indonesias-digital-future/EntrepreneursGoogle in AsiaNext Billion UsersIndonesiaarticleRise and move forward together: Indonesia’s digital futureAs Indonesia navigates COVID-19, we’re extending support to those most in need, and helping prepare for the digital future.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/keyword-g4id2020-hero.max-600x600.pngGooglehttps://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/indonesias-digital-future/Randy JusufManaging DirectorGoogle IndonesiaThe opportunity for “Digital Sprinters”https://blog.google/outreach-initiatives/public-policy/the-opportunity-for-digital-sprinters/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>People around the world are confronting once-in-a-generation challenges: a global pandemic, an economic downturn of unprecedented proportions, rising demands for equity, and dramatic strains on financial resources. </p><p>The rain from this perfect storm is falling hardest on emerging markets. In many cases, they’re struggling to manage the pandemic with fewer public health resources and also suffer from greater economic vulnerabilities. Yet emerging markets also have some of the most vibrant economies and greatest entrepreneurial energy in the world. With the right policy frameworks, they can become ideal launching pads for future innovation. This challenging moment may be exactly the right time for these economies to pursue ambitious digital transformation, using their immediate recovery efforts to develop sustainable economic gains. </p><p>Nearly a third of U.S. small business owners are using digital tools to save their business during the COVID-19 crisis. In emerging markets too, digital technologies are often providing a lifeline: a <a href="https://impactoeconomico.withgoogle.com/intl/pt-BR_br/reports/br-n/#!?stories_activeEl=story-BR-N">plus-size clothes designer in Manaus, Brazil</a>, a <a href="https://grow.google/intl/tr/story/Dore%20Music">musical instruments maker in Istanbul, Turkey</a> and an owner of a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjX-I-yKKfU">guest house in Durban, South Africa</a> have all been able to survive by using digital technologies and online commerce.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3>Becoming “Digital Sprinters”</h3><p>We call these emerging economies “Digital Sprinters” because, by becoming more digital, they have the potential to sprint ahead toward economic development. Based on our experiences, we believe governments and the private sector should focus on four key areas, as detailed in a report <a href="/documents/96/Google-Whitepaper_V5.pdf">we're releasing today</a><a href="/documents/93/Google_Digital_Sprinters_Whitepaper_V8.pdf"></a>:</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><a class="article-image--link" href="https://blog.google/documents/96/Google-Whitepaper_V5.pdf" rel="external" target="_blank"><img alt='Four key areas to focus on regarding "Digital Sprinters"' class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/image_1_svXzxRe.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></a></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><ul><li><b>Physical capital:</b> this is about digital connectivity and infrastructure. It’s not just about investment but also how infrastructure is managed.</li><li><b>Human capital:</b> countries need a comprehensive approach to worker training, economic security, entrepreneurship, and combating discrimination.</li><li><b>Technology:</b> increasing the use of data, artificial intelligence, and cloud computing, which empower the growth of next-generation technologies and unlock future growth. This means new opportunities alongside new questions about how best to harness these technologies.</li><li><b>Competitiveness:</b>policies that promote competitive and open markets, interoperable regulatory standards, and tax regimes that are predictable and based on international standards.</li></ul><p>Our recommendations reflect just one perspective on public policy frameworks for digital transformation. We hope that the report will help advance conversations about digitally-driven growth among governments, civil society, international organizations, academic institutions and entrepreneurs.</p></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><h3>Potential economic gains</h3><p>The economic potential from digital transformation is huge. <a href="https://alphabeta.com/our-research/the-digital-sprinters-capturing-a-us34-trillion-through-innovative-public-policy/">A new study</a> finds that, by 2030, digital transformation could generate as much $3.4 trillion of economic value in these Digital Sprinter markets. At a country level this translates to 25 percent of GDP in Brazil, 31 percent in Saudi Arabia and 33 percent in Nigeria, to name a few examples.</p><br/><p>Emerging markets face a watershed moment today. As COVID-19 is disrupting world order and breaking supply chains, emerging markets have an opportunity to transform and emerge as stronger players. We hope these reports published today can play a part in helping decision-makers take advantage of these opportunities.</p></div></div></body></html>Mon, 16 Nov 2020 08:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/outreach-initiatives/public-policy/the-opportunity-for-digital-sprinters/Public PolicyNext Billion UsersarticleThe opportunity for “Digital Sprinters”A report on Digital Sprinters, and four areas that governments and the private sector should focus on.Googlehttps://blog.google/outreach-initiatives/public-policy/the-opportunity-for-digital-sprinters/Kent WalkerPresident of Global AffairsGoogle & AlphabetBickey Russell finds inspiration from his native Bangladeshhttps://blog.google/inside-google/life-at-google/bickey-russell-finds-inspiration-his-native-bangladesh/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>Welcome to the latest edition of “My Path to Google,” where we talk to Googlers, interns and alumni about how they got to Google, what their roles are like and even some tips on how to prepare for interviews.</p><br/><p>Having spent his childhood between London, Milan and Dhaka, Bangladesh, Bickey Russell began his career at Google in sales before pursuing his passion for developing technology to serve under-resourced communities. Today, he’s the founder and leader of <a href="https://kormo.google.com/index_en.html">Kormo Jobs</a>. Guided by Google's commitment to our <a href="https://ai.google/principles/">AI Principles</a>, Bickey and his team are helping job seekers across Bangladesh, Indonesia, and India find meaningful work. </p><br/><p><b>What’s your role at Google?</b></p><p>I founded the <a href="https://kormo.google.com/index_en.html">Kormo Jobs app</a> and currently lead global product operations for it as well as some other new projects in the <a href="https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/">Next Billion Users</a> initiative at Google.</p><br/><p>I drive Kormo Jobs’ go-to-market approach. This involves things like working with employers to use Kormo Jobs to post openings on our platform and building up a community of job seekers who get value from Kormo Jobs as they look for work and grow their careers.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="Students holding up pamphlets about Kormo" class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/DSCF8028.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p>Participants at a vocational training institute in Jakarta learning about Kormo Jobs.</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>You’ve held a few different roles in multiple offices. How did you end up working on Kormo Jobs? </b></p><p>I’m super passionate about the positive impact technology can have on society in countries like my native Bangladesh. Throughout my career at Google I have moved from business analysis to sales, partnerships management and leadership roles, and worked in London, Mountain View and currently, Singapore. Despite all that change, I have always been involved with initiatives to make Google products work better in Bangladesh—ranging from Maps to Bangla language capabilities. </p><br/><p>In 2016, I was fortunate to be able to collaborate with colleagues and pitch an app idea I had to Google’s internal innovation incubator, <a href="https://area120.google.com/">Area 120</a>. We were hoping to use machine learning to build a better way to help people in Bangladesh get jobs in more blue-collar sectors. Our small team was fortunate to join the Area 120 program, and after just three years, our app became a Google product. <a href="https://kormo.google.com/index_en.html">Kormo</a> Jobs is live in Bangladesh, India and Indonesia. </p><p><b>And what were you up to before joining Google?</b></p><p>I grew up in London, Milan and Dhaka, spending middle school and high school  in Dhaka before returning to London for university where I did a degree in geography.</p><p>I worked in retail throughout my time in university. The highlight was probably selling band t-shirts in Camden Market! My first full-time job was working as a researcher, and then as a business analyst. </p><p><b>Can you tell us about your decision to apply to Google?</b></p><p>I was fascinated by the Internet, and I wanted to join a fast-paced company that has an entrepreneurial and open working culture. Google’s vision was majorly inspiring and so attractive to me at the time, and it still is. I felt that if I could join a company like that, I could make an impact.</p><p>I applied via the Google careers page. The interview day was quite nerve-wracking, but actually a lot of fun. I remember talking a lot about my interest in cricket, plus my favorite websites and Google products. I was also asked to propose a plan on how we might develop the market for Google AdWords in the UK for a particular industry. That was a challenge, but I guess I did okay!</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="The Kormo Jobs app being presented." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/MVIMG_20190919_122312.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p>The Kormo Jobs app being presented at a Google India event.</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>Can you tell us about the resources you used to prepare for your interview or role?</b><br/></p><p>I didn’t know anyone who worked at Google at the time, but since I knew the job was to join the advertising business in the UK, I reached out and talked to a lot of my network in the advertising and media space to prepare. Plus, I used Search to do research!</p><br/><p><b>Do you have any tips you’d like to share with aspiring Googlers?</b></p><p>I would say that aspiring Googlers should really think about <i>why</i> they are interested in the specific role they are applying for. I often interview candidates who are keen to work at Google but haven’t done enough preparation on why they would be a good fit for the role and team that they have applied to join.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="Bickey working with an employer using Kormo Jobs." class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/IMG_20171221_103711_1.max-1000x1000.jpg" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p>Bickey working with an employer using Kormo Jobs.</p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>What inspires you to log in every day?</b></p><p>Having been at the company a long time, I’ve seen firsthand countless times the impact technology can have on people and society at large.</p><br/><p>I am inspired by the fact that Google’s <a href="https://ai.google/principles/">AI Principles</a> guide us to make socially beneficial AI systems—and that I get to work with an amazing team at Kormo Jobs to put this principle into practice every day. We invest in applying our tech capability to solving important problems—finding work, earning money, building a career—to people in places like my home town of Dhaka.</p><br/><p>Every day I get excited when I see that we’ve helped more people get a job than we did the day before.</p></div></div></body></html>Thu, 12 Nov 2020 16:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/inside-google/life-at-google/bickey-russell-finds-inspiration-his-native-bangladesh/My Path to GoogleLife at GoogleGooglersAINext Billion UsersarticleBickey Russell finds inspiration from his native BangladeshFounder of the Kormo Jobs App, Bickey Russell, shares his path to Google and how he works to help his native Bangladesh.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/mptg_x_1.0.max-600x600.pngGooglehttps://blog.google/inside-google/life-at-google/bickey-russell-finds-inspiration-his-native-bangladesh/Bill ReeveEngineering Residency Program ManagerBuilding a more inclusive internet, beyond COVID-19https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/new-internet-users-covid-19/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>Between 2015 and 2020, more than 1.5 billion people began using the internet for the first time. Another billion more are set to join them online by 2025.</p><p>Most of these new internet users come from Asia, Latin America and Africa. They experience the internet differently from those who came before them—connecting on their phones and adopting new apps and tools incredibly quickly.  More and more, it’s their <a href="https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/next-billion-users-are-future-internet/">needs and ideas</a> that are shaping the future of technology, in areas from <a href="https://blog.google/perspectives/caesar-sengupta/banks-governments-and-tech-need-work-together/">financial inclusion</a> to <a href="https://blog.google/products/translate/five-new-languages/">language translation</a>. </p><p>Today, though, new internet users face their biggest challenge—the <a href="https://kstatic.googleusercontent.com/files/c9eb68e0d78c409feb5d8d8c637e326df71cb275cf34db311670d561dbb5a48199e877138f70ab68c8edaf32758c02cdeb897a9d5cb47b046924375adf8e3af0">impact of COVID-19</a>. How we help them get through it will go a long way towards ensuring the recovery from the pandemic is inclusive and sustainable. </p><p><b>A half-decade of change  </b></p><p>Without question, the internet is more accessible and democratic than it was in 2015. Data costs have plummeted, helping the number of smartphone owners reach <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/330695/number-of-smartphone-users-worldwide/">more than three billion people</a>. The proportion of non-English speakers using the internet has reached <a href="https://www.statista.com/statistics/262946/share-of-the-most-common-languages-on-the-internet/">three quarters of the global total</a>, and people around the world are increasingly using video and voice as their tools to find information and services online.<br/></p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="The changing digital landscape 2015-2020" class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/1_NBUDigitalLandscape_v12.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="New users trends 2015-2020" class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/2_NBU_Trends_v7.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>For Google, our work building for new users has helped us build better for everyone. Since we launched the <a href="https://nextbillionusers.google/">Next Billion Users</a> initiative five years ago, it’s led to breakthroughs we wouldn’t otherwise have made—from offline modes in YouTube and Maps, to AI that can <a href="https://blog.google/outreach-initiatives/education/early-access-read-along/">help kids read</a> in multiple languages, apps that <a href="https://www.blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/making-privacy-personal-files-google/">protect privacy</a> on shared devices, and the new user experience in Google Pay (<a href="https://india.googleblog.com/2018/08/google-pay-next-step-in-tez-journey.html">first launched  in India</a> and soon coming to the rest of the world). We’re also sharing <a href="https://nextbillionusers.google/tools/">open-source tools and guidelines</a> to help others, because we know that supporting new users is a shared goal.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="Google NBU product launches" class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/4_NBU_Product_Launches_v5_Simplified_v2.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>Over the past-half decade, the technology industry has made meaningful progress in closing digital divides, helping millions more people a week share in the benefits technology creates. Yet as the pandemic increases the importance of technology in our lives, work, education and health, the risk is that this progress will slow or, worse, reverse. </p><p><b>The impact of COVID-19</b></p><p>We asked new internet users <a href="https://kstatic.googleusercontent.com/files/c9eb68e0d78c409feb5d8d8c637e326df71cb275cf34db311670d561dbb5a48199e877138f70ab68c8edaf32758c02cdeb897a9d5cb47b046924375adf8e3af0">how the coronavirus has affected them</a>, and many told us it’s added to pressures they already face. At a time when essential services are increasingly moving online, it’s becoming harder and harder for new users to access the internet in the first place.  </p><p>The combination of fewer jobs, lower income and higher prices means they’re forced to ration their data. Food and shelter have to take priority—and with more people at home, even when data is available, it tends to be spread thinly across multiple family members.  </p><p>On top of that, a lack of digital literacy means new users often struggle to take advantage of government financial aid, community resources or schooling. And when it comes to the virus itself, many are finding it hard to separate fact from misinformation, or to find reliable healthcare options.</p><p>Not surprisingly, all this is taking a toll on new internet users’ sense of emotional wellbeing, interrupting their support systems and forcing them to put some of their aspirations on hold. </p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image h-c-grid__col--10 h-c-grid__col--offset-1 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--8"><img alt="Impact of COVID-19 on new users" class="article-image--full" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/3_NIUCOVID_v9_1.max-1000x1000.png" tabindex="0"/></div></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><b>How we help new users from here: economy, education, ecosystem</b></p><p>Countering the impact of the virus by helping new users through and beyond COVID should be a priority for industry, governments, international organizations and nonprofits.</p><p>First, we have to make sure new users have easy-to-use tools that meet their immediate economic needs.<br/></p><p>We recognise Google’s responsibility in this. Apps like <a href="https://india.googleblog.com/2020/08/connecting-people-to-economic.html">Kormo Jobs in Bangladesh, India and Indonesia</a> — which connects people to entry level jobs—are already playing a role helping people find work. In the coming months, we’ll be experimenting with a new Google product that can provide additional earning opportunities through crowdsourcing, recognising that for most new internet users, protecting income is the first priority. </p><p>Second, we have to increase our focus on education—helping new users better understand online information and services, and adapt to deeper changes like the rise of online education. </p><p>Grassroots, nonprofit-led literacy initiatives like those Google.org is supporting in <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/media-literacy-for-asias-next-generation/">Southeast Asia</a> are important steps in the right direction. So too are the Google News Initiative’s partnerships throughout <a href="https://www.digimente.org/">Latin America</a>, and Grow with Google’s global programs like <a href="https://beinternetawesome.withgoogle.com/en_us">Be Internet Awesome</a>, which promotes online safety and confidence for kids. It’s critical that we build on these programs in the aftermath of the pandemic. </p><p>Third, we have to keep building a supportive ecosystem around new users. We should aspire for every organization that owns or builds technology to prioritize inclusion.</p><p>Too often, the responsibility for helping new users get online <a href="https://kstatic.googleusercontent.com/files/595f5129811057b9fdc780a1e67daf8a161046e88819fafd323ffbcff63a8fbdbdfe3c6c3448b12b9e4d925d337cbd8cb7f382c7ad51603b941ec3fb8e2b9718">falls to ‘informal teachers’</a>, the friends and family around them. Initiatives like the <a href="https://digitalconfidence.design/">Design Toolkit for Digital Confidence</a> show how we can begin to change that, equipping technology-makers to build tools that are intuitive for everyone, no matter what their circumstances.</p><p>Finally, we have to keep advancing the work that led Google to create the NBU initiative in 2015: ensuring the internet and the devices and the tools it supports are helpful and accessible to <a href="https://blog.google/products/android/android-go-camera-go/">more people</a>, in <a href="https://blog.google/products/translate/five-new-languages/">more languages</a> and <a href="https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/make-google-read-it/">more ways</a> (including for <a href="https://blog.google/outreach-initiatives/accessibility/national-disability-employment-awareness-month-2020/">those living with disabilities</a>). </p><p>COVID-19 is a challenge for everyone, and it’s hitting new internet users especially hard. But if governments, businesses and civil society organizations work together, we can and should make the internet better and more inclusive in the post-COVID world, for the billions online today, and the next billion to come.</p><p><br/></p></div></div></body></html>Wed, 28 Oct 2020 01:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/new-internet-users-covid-19/COVID-19Next Billion UsersarticleBuilding a more inclusive internet, beyond COVID-19New internet users are being hit hard by COVID-19—we should support them by making the internet even more inclusive beyond the pandemic.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/BR_202010_ALE_04_X0175.max-600x600.jpgGooglehttps://blog.google/technology/next-billion-users/new-internet-users-covid-19/Caesar SenguptaGeneral Manager & VP, Payments and Next Billion UsersAndroid 11 (Go edition): New features coming to more deviceshttps://blog.google/products/android/android-11-go-edition-new-features-coming-more-devices/<html><head></head><body><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p>We first introduced Android (Go edition) in 2018 to provide a high-quality smartphone experience for entry-level device owners around the world. Since then, Android (Go edition) has brought improved speed, reliability, and security to over 100 million entry-level devices through apps and features specifically built to address local needs. Continuing on with that same mission, here’s a look at what’s new in Android 11 (Go edition).  </p><p><br/></p><h3>Improving communication, privacy and usability</h3><p>On Android 11 (Go edition)  apps launch 20 percent faster than they did on Android 10 (Go edition), making it easier for you to switch between apps without your phone getting bogged down. </p><br/><p>Around the world people use different messaging apps to stay in touch, so they often find themselves toggling between them to chat with family and friends. Now Android 11 (Go edition) shows all of your conversations in a dedicated space in the notification section. This means you can see, respond to, and manage your conversations with family and friends all in one place, no matter what apps they use. </p><br/><p>Affordability shouldn’t mean compromising privacy and security, which is why we’ve ensured that Go edition smartphones have access to the same industry-leading privacy protections as any Android device. Android 11 (Go edition) comes with new privacy enhancements that make it easier to control how and when data on your device is shared. With one-time permissions, you can grant an app access to specific sensors like your microphone, camera or location, just in that instance. And if you haven’t used an app for an extended period of time, app permissions will “auto-reset” and you will immediately receive a notification of the change. You can always choose to re-grant the app permissions the next time you open the app. </p><p><br/></p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--2 h-c-grid__col--4 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-5 h-c-grid__col--offset-4"><img alt="03_revoked.gif" class="article-image--small" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/original_images/03_revoked.gif" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p><br/></p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><i>Grant individual apps one-time permissions to access sensors like your microphone, camera or location.</i></p><p>As devices with larger screen displays become more common,  Android 11 (Go edition) helps you take advantage of the increased screen real estate for your favorite apps. With gesture-based navigation you can go to the home screen, navigate backward, and fluidly switch between apps using simple swipes.<br/></p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--2 h-c-grid__col--4 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-5 h-c-grid__col--offset-4"><img alt="04_gesture-nav-go.gif" class="article-image--small" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/original_images/04_gesture-nav-go.gif" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p><br/></p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><i>Switch between apps using simple swipes with gesture navigation</i></p><p><br/></p><h3>New app features</h3><p>This year, we’ve also introduced improvements to our suite of apps that were specially designed for entry-level smartphones. For example, <a href="https://blog.google/around-the-globe/google-asia/making-privacy-personal-files-google/">Safe Folder</a> is a new feature in Files by Google that protects  personal files from being opened or accessed by others by storing them in a 4-digit PIN-encrypted folder.</p></div></div><div class="block-image_full_width"><div class="h-c-page"><div class="article-image__is-caption h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3 h-c-grid__col--offset-2"><img alt="Safe Folder Walkthrough GIF.gif" class="article-image--large" src="https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/original_images/Safe_Folder_Walkthrough_GIF.gif" tabindex="0"/></div><figcaption class="article-image__caption article-image__is-caption-image h-c-grid__col--8 h-c-grid__col--offset-2 h-c-grid__col-l--6 h-c-grid__col-l--offset-3"><div class="rich-text"><p><br/></p></div></figcaption></div></div><div class="block-paragraph"><div class="rich-text"><p><i>Browse files  safely and securely with PIN-encrypted Safe Folder</i></p><p><i><br/></i></p><h3>More memory, more devices, more options</h3><p>In the past two years, smartphone manufacturers have produced high-quality Android devices—with features like dual cameras or fingerprint scanners—at more affordable prices. As more of these memory-intensive features come to entry-level smartphones, our partners have asked us to improve performance on these devices, particularly around speed, storage, and memory. So, starting next month Android (Go edition) will be available on all new devices with up to 2GB of memory.<br/><br/>With the expansion to 2GB, apps launch up to 20 percent faster, and with an additional 270 MB of additional free memory, people can now run three to four more apps in the background. Android (Go edition) on 2GB devices also comes with up to 900MB of additional free storage space—enough to take up to 300 more selfies and download an entire movie.</p><br/><p>Learn more at <a href="http://android.com/go">android.com/go</a></p></div></div></body></html>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 16:00:00 +0000https://blog.google/products/android/android-11-go-edition-new-features-coming-more-devices/AndroidNext Billion UsersarticleAndroid 11 (Go edition): New features coming to more devicesThe new Android 11 (Go edition) features will bring a faster, more reliable, and more secure user experience for entry-level device owners.https://storage.googleapis.com/gweb-uniblog-publish-prod/images/android_11_go_edition_v2.max-600x600.pngGooglehttps://blog.google/products/android/android-11-go-edition-new-features-coming-more-devices/Sagar KamdarVP of Product ManagementAndroid